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Licensed to Analyze?

Jan 17th, 08:14

KK4MIJ

Joined: Aug 21st 2016, 21:03
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
An unusual question to be sure.

if a ham with a technician license wishes to string up a 40 or 80 meter dipole for the purpose of listening only, this is acceptable.

But, can the same technician use a hand held antenna analyzer to tune that same 40 or 80 meter antenna for better reception?

I have done some digging, but have not found anything that specifically addresses this. However, my gut tells me that because an analyzer is in fact a signal generator, and generates a signal however low power, would still be out of band on 40 or 80 meters if used by a technician without a control operator of higher license.

Could I please get some feedback for this theoretical question?

Steven
KK4MIJ

KK4MIJ@GMAIL.COM
Jan 19th, 17:49

KK4MIJ

Joined: Aug 21st 2016, 21:03
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
Perhaps this is not the best place to ask this question.

Can some one please advise which forum would be more appropriate?


Regards,
Steven
Jan 21st, 16:12

WB1GCM

Super Moderator

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
Steven,

I have found that many antenna analyzers have an output of between 5 and 15 mW output. My department manager has worked DX and most states on less power than that.

Technically, the analyzer is a small transmitter and one should identify the station call sign. On the other hand, I have not heard anyone identify using an analyzer; there are no means to do that except break the antenna circuit with a Morse Key. I would not worry too much about it, but would avoid using one if the band is wide open and full of signals. Just be brief and don't let it transmit on one frequency for very long.

Bob Allison
WB1GCM
ARRL Laboratory Assistant Manager
Jan 22nd, 21:26

KK4MIJ

Joined: Aug 21st 2016, 21:03
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
Bob,
Thank you for your thoughts. As mentioned in my first post, this was a theoretical situation. I was just curious as to the FCC guidelines regarding using such an analyzer " out of band". Fortunately this has never occurred as there are always other hams that are more than eager to lend a hand to any one needing help.

Best Regards,
Steven R. Beyke Sr.
KK4MIJ
Mar 6th, 09:49

W1VT

Super Moderator

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
97.305
(b) A station may transmit a test emission on any frequency authorized to the control operator for brief periods for experimental purposes, except that no pulse modulation emission may be transmitted on any frequency where pulse is not specifically authorized and no SS modulation emission may be transmitted on any frequency where SS is not specifically authorized.
May 2nd, 10:36

W9BRD

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
If the field strength that results from the test signal falls inside the limit set by FCC rules Part 15.209 -- https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/47/15.209; also see https://www.fcc.gov/bureaus/oet/info/documents/bulletins/oet63/oet63rev.pdf -- the analyzer can be considered an unlicensed transmitter that complies with FCC rules Part 15, and Part 97 does not apply.

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