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Newbie General Repeater Question

Feb 15th, 17:10

GrandAdam12

Joined: Jan 18th, 14:06
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I appreciate any guidance. I have looked but haven’t found my answer online. When two people talk through a repeater, both individuals are communicating on the uplink and listening on the downlink? When person A talks to person B through the repeater, person B’s communication is not ‘routed’ back through the downlink to person A, both are using the same up and down links? Assuming this is true, then it is true that modern ham radios, HT’s are configured as such that when the offset is correct, person A will Tx on the uplink and the radio will know to listen on the downlink frequency? And I assume that any digital communication would take the same ‘route’? My computer network background is overlapping here. Hope this makes sense. I am just trying to get it straight in my head.

Thank you,

Tom
Feb 16th, 09:52

W1VT

Super Moderator

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
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Yes, FM radios designed for ham radio use will have the repeater offsets programmed in automatically according the standard band conventions. Both transmitters will use the same uplink frequencies and listen on the same downlink frequencies.

Zak W1VT
ARRL Senior Lab Engineer
Feb 16th, 10:25

GrandAdam12

Joined: Jan 18th, 14:06
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Total Posts: 0
Thank you Zak. It is clear to me now why the repeaters are local comms as both parties have to be within range, i.e. that is where the longer distances come into play with digital/Internet...

Just a side question, what is the point of having a repeater that reaches greater distance if the uplink is local? Is it that person A can use local repeater and person B at 30 miles can use their local repeater and we each listen on the perspective downlink frequency?

I appreciate your direction, hope you don't mind the questions.

Thank you,

Tom
Feb 16th, 10:48

W1VT

Super Moderator

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
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A wide range repeater allows more people to listen in to what is being said. It may be useful in a weather emergency to get the message out to as many people as possible.

Internet links may not be reliable in weather emergencies.

Zak W1VT
ARRL Senior Lab Engineer
Feb 16th, 12:07

GrandAdam12

Joined: Jan 18th, 14:06
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Thank you Zak...
Feb 22nd, 14:48

WA0CBW

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
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Total Posts: 0
Tom,
Not sure you understood Zak's answer. Everyone must be in range of the repeater (both transmitting and receiving) to hear each other. If you are talking on your local repeater you will not be heard on the repeater 30 miles away unless the repeaters are linked together.

In other words the down link frequency of one repeater is not the up link frequency of another. Repeaters are linked by other means described above (wire line, internet, RF, etc.).
Bill - WA0CBW
ARRL Technical Coordinator - Kansas Section

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