ARRL

Contest Update Issues

Preview
The ARRL Contest Update
February 4, 2009
Editor: Ward Silver, NØAX
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IN THIS ISSUE
  • Born to Run - North American Sprints, Phone & CW
  • Character Building - CQ WPX RTTY
  • Changes to WPX RTTY Rules
  • New On-line Ham Magazines
  • CQ WPX SSB Results Available
  • Which Match to Catch?
  • Why a Y?

NEW HF OPERATORS - THINGS TO DO

The School Club Roundup runs all week from 9 - 13 Feb on Phone, CW, and digital modes. Why not get on and hand out some contacts to let those young hams know how much fun you're having?

BULLETINS

The start date for the CQ WW 160 SSB contest is 27 Feb, not 28 as reported in the February QST Contest Corral. The date is correct in the online version of Contest Corral.

BUSTED QSOS

Glenn K6NA noted that Don W6EEN was a major supporter of NCDXF (Northern California DX Foundation), listed as NCDXC in the preceding issue.

CONTEST SUMMARY

Complete information for all contests follows the Commentary section

February 7-8

  • Vermont QSO Party
  • Ten-Ten Winter Phone QSO Party
  • Worldwide Peace Messenger Cities
  • Black Sea Cup International
  • Minnesota QSO Party
  • FYBO Winter QRP Field Day
  • British Columbia QSO Challenge
  • Delaware QSO Party
  • New Mexico QSO Party
  • XE Int'l RTTY Contest
  • FM Simplex Contest
  • North American Sprint, CW
  • School Club Roundup

February 14-15

  • Valentine's Day Sprint, PSK
  • YL-OM Contest, Phone
  • CQ WW RTTY WPX
  • Northern New York QSO Party
  • New Hampshire QSO Party
  • Asia-Pacific Sprint, CW
  • Dutch PACC Contest
  • Louisana QSO Party
  • OMISS QSO Party, Phone
  • FISTS CW Winter Sprint
  • RSGB 1.8 MHz Contest, CW
  • North American Sprint, Phone
  • Classic Exchange, Phone
NEWS, PRESS RELEASES, AND GENERAL INTEREST

Manager of the CQ WPX RTTY Contest, Ed W0YK notes that there are some subtle changes from past WPX RTTY rules that should be noted for this year's contest coming up next weekend (14-15 Feb). For example:

  • The band-change limit for MS and M2 is increased to 8 per hour.
  • Low Power limit is reduced to 100 watts.
  • Single-band entries have been added to the Low Power category.
  • The Rookie category has been eliminated.
  • See the contest Web site for late changes to SWL category.
  • Added Spanish and Asiatic Russian call areas to awards.

As sometimes happens with a set of changes, an inadvertent contradiction crept in for the M2 category. The serial numbering is specified two different ways, so either is acceptable for 2009. The intention was for both M2 and MM logs to have serial number sequences per band. Unfortunately, in the Exchange paragraph of the rules, a typo states M2 should have one serial number sequence for the complete log, same as MS. This will be corrected in the 2010 rules.

The second ARRL Homebrew Challenge was announced on page 75 of February 2009 QST. This challenge is to build a 5 W to 50 W linear amplifier, perhaps to work with the 5 W CW/SSB transceiver from the first Homebrew Challenge, with a total cost of less than $125. The first challenge was well-received--we can all look forward to some great designs from this one, too!

Before taking on top leadership positions, Scott K0DQ was quite a contesting force. Now that he has retired, listen for his return to the bands.

Contest operator and retired director of the National Counterterrorism Center, Scott K0DQ, was recently awarded the National Security Medal for his long and distinguished service to the country. Congratulations, Scott, and on behalf of us all, bravo zulu (well done), I might add.

Wow - how about those conditions for the CQ WW 160 contest? "The contest was historic," said new CQ 160 Contest Director Andy Blank N2NT in a story on radio-sport.net, "the equivalent of 20 meters transplanted to 1.8 MHz." Conditions had been great for the entire week preceding the contest, leading to fears of that the ionosphere would "tease and die" as it has been known to do before contests. This year, the conditions barreled right along, with openings in which even the little pistols could bag some DX. Records will fall like tenpins this year, so watch for the results! Some have wondered about whether conditions would stage a repeat in 27 days, making the ARRL DX CW and CQ WW 160 SSB weekends ones to watch.

The CQ WPX SSB contest has a new searchable score database containing all log submissions from 1996 to 2008! Search selections allow you to filter the database by year, continent, country, category, and call sign. There are options to select viewing band breakdowns, club names, complete operator lists, and sort order. The database also contains all soapbox comments and these can be viewed for each contest. As the data gets older, it gets sparser, so if you note errors or omissions, contact Randy at k5zd@cqwpx.com. (Thanks, Randy K5ZD, CQ WPX Contest Director)

Laura L. Smith of Pennsylvania has been named by the FCC to fill the vacancy created when Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH, retired in 2008 as Special Counsel for the Spectrum Enforcement Division of the FCC's Enforcement Bureau. Ms Smith is not currently a ham, but one can always hope that she'll join us on the air eventually.

Alpha Radio Products LLC is now shipping the first production run of AP8410 amplifiers shipped. The 1.5 kW output amplifier uses the new Alpha Power brand VTX-X118 tubes, a ceramic, external-anode, indirectly heated tetrode better able to handle the grid current that might be experienced in the AP8410 than the comparable Eimac 4CX1000 tube. In what seems to be a stealthily developing trend, the amplifier features a USB control interface, as well.

Contest training is catching on all over! The Northern California Contest Club is sponsoring a contesting seminar called "Contest Academy" at this year's International DX Convention (IDXC) in Visalia on Friday, 17 April. Topics will cover the basics of contesting, drawing from NCCC's 38-year history. If you're on the continental side of the Atlantic, you might also be interested in the first Italian "University Contest" to be held at the Montichiari Fair, 14 March 2009. Programming will designed for the beginner to the expert. (Thanks, Marc W6ZZZ and Tim K3LR)

With so many contests accepting (or even requiring) Cabrillo-formatted logs, how can you get your club's small contest set up to work with Cabrillo logs if you don't have a software guru "on staff"? Here's a free Cabrillo log tool from W3KM that can make the job a little easier. There are plenty of setup files and guidance to help you get going! If you need some encouragement and helpful hints, try contacting the managers of other contests like yours, as well.

How can you find a contester's email address? If they haven't posted it on a Web site like QRZ.com or on a club Web site, one good way is to enter "[call sign] 3830" into a search engine. If they've posted to 3830, you'll get several hits. I also add the year to restrict the search to recent posts.

This is what a radio butler looks like! The SkimScan software by W3OA controls a CW Skimmer application to monitor frequencies of interest on a schedule of your choosing.

Ever wished for your very own Jeeves to scan the bands for you while you're busy? Dick W3OA wrote a program called SkimScan to tune a CW Skimmer to different frequencies on one of four different schedules you specify, each containing up to 15 different frequencies. It runs under Windows XP and Vista. You'll never miss another DXpedition firing up on a "dead" band!

Can you send in a check log for a contest and still get a log checking report (LCR)? Sure! There is no reason to withhold a log if you were just a casual entrant or operated more than the maximum time, for example. The Cabrillo-formatted log file header should include the line CATEGORY-OPERATOR: CHECKLOG and the sponsors will take it from there. If the sponsors generate LCR's, you should be able to get a look at the same contact cross-checking results as if you'd submitted the log for inclusion in the competitive listings.

Web Site of the Week- Steve K4GUN may be best known in the contest community for his roving exploits, but a recent mishap on a hunting trip highlighted another facet of ham radio of which we all should be aware--its use in emergencies, including those on a personal scale. Read all about it in his eham.net article and consider whether you might benefit from being prepared, as well.

WORD TO THE WISE

Zero beat - As the two signals approach the same frequency, you will hear a beat tone that represents the difference between the signals. When the signals are on the same frequency, there is "zero beat". This is important in contesting on a crowded or noisy band when the CQ-ing stations may be using very narrow filters. You may need to be within 100 Hz of the transmitted signal to be heard! Forgetting to clear the RIT setting between QSOs can be a problem, too. Setting your logging software to send the "RIT Clear" command after every QSO is one way to help out. (Thanks, Tree N6TR)

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SIGHTS AND SOUNDS

WorldRadio magazine is now on-line in PDF format. WorldRadio readers will feel right at home, with many of the same columnists now in electronic format. More Web publishing is happening--if you haven't seen the new on-line HAM-MAG, give it a try! Subscriptions are free and the first couple of issues have been entertaining, with a nice combination of short articles on a variety of subjects, including operating and things to build. Merci beaucoup to both CQ and HAM-MAG!

Universe Today has posted a series of YouTube videos that provide a personal tour of the ISS. Without all that training and rocket stuff to get there, of course. (from the AMSAT Bulletin, ANS-032)

OK, confess--you liked playing with Lego blocks and secretly wish you had some right now! Well, here's a great ham radio application of Lego stuff, believe it or not. No, it's not a ninety-foot crank-up tower! (Thanks, Mike AI4NS)

No, this is not the Science Comedian. It's Mike W9RE displaying his satorial skills at the 2008 Dayton pre-hamfest Buffalo Wings Fashion Show organized by K9PG. The attendee with the most noteworthy attire takes the prize. No contest! (Photo, Paul K9PG)

I've been known to tell a good ham radio joke now and then, but this guy's a real professional. The Science Comedian provides witty repartee and stand-up comedy with a science theme and, apparently, really knocks 'em dead.

Here's a nicely done video of N0TU's Straight Key Night experiences a few weeks ago. If you're a "real radios glow in the dark" fan, you'll feel right at home. I've fired up a boat anchor or two on SKN in my day. The CW is slow enough that a non-ham can get the feel of it, as well.

And those "good old days" of learning Morse - this video of a Naval Radio School Morse class from 1941 shows how they di-dit back then. (Thanks, Paul VE3HOP)

RESULTS AND RECORDS

CQ WPX Contest Director Randy K5ZD announces that the 2008 CQ WPX SSB Contest results are now available on-line, including links to the full magazine results (write-up and scores) in Adobe PDF format. Take a look in the News section for information about the new searchable scores database.

The results from the 2008 RAC Canada Day contest have been published in The Canadian Amateur (TCA) and on the RAC Web site. They are published under the Canada Day section of the Contesting page in the Results group from previous years. (Thanks, Bart VE5CPU, RAC Canada Day Contest Manager)

JIDX Contest Committee Chairman, Tack JE1CKA/KH0AM reports that he has compiled and posted a list of logs received for the 2008 JIDX PHONE contest. Please check to be sure your submitted log is on the list and in the correct category.

Results for the 2008 Freeze Your Butt Off Field Day have been posted to the Arizona ScQRPions Web site along with updated rules for the 2009 event. (Thanks, John K5JS)

OPERATING TIP

When the bands are crowded (and when aren't they?) it's important to make a little extra effort to be sure you confirm the QSO. One excellent method is to send the other station's call when giving the exchange. As Tree N6TR notes, "I know it takes some time - but if you don't do in cases where the QSO isn't a "slam dunk" - you are risking a not-in-log."

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TECHNICAL TOPICS AND INFORMATION

A concise answer to the question, "Why choose a Pi, T, or L-network for impedance matching?" was given by Joe W3JDR. "The L network is the lowest Q configuration that can be constructed for a given set of terminating impedances. Specify the terminating impedances and a frequency, and the Q is pre-ordained and unchangeable, but bandwidth is the maximum obtainable and the loss is the lowest achievable (although) it only transforms impedances in one direction. On the other hand, with the PI or the T, by varying the component values, you can theoretically match anything to anything. This is done by transforming the input impedance to an "intermediate" impedance and then transforming again to the output impedance. This process gives you complete control of all network parameters, including the Q. The higher the Q of your matching network, the sharper the frequency response but the higher the insertion loss."

First it was computers that ran faster than our radios, now it's battery chargers. Featured in an article in the 22 January issue of EDN magazine, the new BQ24150 battery charger IC from Texas Instruments is made to charge portable device batteries from power supplied by a USB port. It operates at a cool 3 MHz, meaning that the energy-storing inductor is only 1 uH. With USB ports ubiquitous in computers, charging (or operating) an accessory or even a QRP radio battery pack from this power source is quite practical. This chip is not entirely unique as several manufacturers offer comparable charge control chips.

Also in the 22 Jan issue of EDN, a Design Idea by Antony Smith, "Inexpensive self-resetting circuit breaker requires few parts", presents a circuit that could have real value in a power supply and goes into sufficient detail as to be an interesting tutorial on this interesting analog circuit.

The Instructable shows a case for an MP3 holder, but the resemblance to a handheld radio is unmistakeable. A duct tape radio case...how cool is that?

Solderless breadboards are a popular way of making temporary circuits and prototypes. If you haven't tried it, this Instructable on using a breadboard can help. And who doesn't have duct tape in the shack? You might not have thought of these novel uses for "part number one"!

One of the first to develop antenna modeling software for amateur radio, Brian K6STI maintains a Web site with lots of technical resources, particularly useful calculator programs. (Thanks, Tim K3LR)

Looking for a good source of gears, levers, rollers, and small mechanical gadgets of all sorts? Dan N5AR recommends old printers. "I have picked up many parts of this type in flea markets for almost nothing. They came from dismantled printers. You can probably get a free printer to take apart if you ask at your next club meeting. I particularly like the non-slip cog belts and pulleys."

Doug W9WI points out that using more than one wireless keyboard in a multi-op station may cause problems when the keyboards automatically negotiate with their base station to find a channel when the computer is booted or if the keyboard controller resets from EMI. For some models, if there's more than one base station within range, you have no idea which one it's going to handshake with! You could find the 40 meter keyboard controlling the 10 meter computer! Not all wireless keyboards have this problem, but a little due diligence is definitely in order.

Having occasionally earned their reputation as unwelcome sources of widespread harmful interference, HF operators will not be shedding any tears over the possibility of the European Union banning plasma video displays. Not, of course, because of emissions, but because of excessive power consumption. (The 100-watt incandescent light bulb is another technological "item non grata" for the same reason.)

In time, recharging your rig's portable power source may require a corkscrew rather than an electrical plug. Technology Review reports that advances in catalyst chemistry are making it possible to use ethanol in fuel cells rather than methanol, a fuel that's easier to make and less toxic. This will probably lead to bad jokes about "having one's contest and drinking it, too", but as the pace of advancement quickens, we may see chemical powered fuel-cells begin to replace gasoline or diesel-powered generators as the power sources behind those coveted multiplier signals.

Technical Web Site of the Week-- It will be a while before fuel cells can power the equipment that requires the type of serious RF component sold by the QRO Stuff Store in its construction or use! Tim K3LR recommends the vendor as a good source of Russian-made transmitting components.

CONVERSATION

Why a Y?

Indeed! The Y I'm referring to is one of the beginning contester's best friends, the Y-adapter for his or her headphones. We should all have a box full of them for when the new contester (or potential ham) comes calling during the multi-op.

This prevents the usual "look at all the backs of heads" experienced by visitors to a radio contest team in operation. If it's a phone contest, everybody is yelling, but you can't hear the other side of the conversation. And if it's a CW contest, all you hear is the amplifier fans, lots of clickety-click from the typing and sending, and the occasional muttered, "Damn!" Not exactly easy to explain and harder to understand what the attraction could possibly be.

Let's say the visiting ham expresses an interest in giving it a try. They either get 160 at high noon or 10 meters at midnight. Good luck with having any fun at that! Or worse, Joe Pro leans back, opines that it's time for a snack and a nap and here, have at it, keep the rate up! I'm not sure which is worse, being fed to the lions or hunting for one a deserted band.

Where does the Y-adapter come in? Think of it as an on-ramp to the superhighway of radiosport! That new ham or visitor can sit at the elbow of Joe or Jean and listen as the QSO counter keeps ticking away. And face it, we all love an audience to impress with our contestly wisdom by tossing an aside here and there as the battle rages all around us.

In days gone by, the apprentice would do the logging at the knee (or elbow) of the contesting Elmer, freeing the main operator to run like blazes and everybody had a good time. Today, the run operator keeps fingertips flying on the keyboard, so a new operator has less to do. That means they have plenty of time to listen. And learn.

Seriously, while that new contester is listening is the time to feed them the nuggets of guidance and answer their questions. "Why did you pick the fast station over the slow one?" "How did you learn to sort out the calls?" "Why did you just turn the RF Gain way down?" They can hear and learn right there on the spot, with the real world experience happening right in their head. There is no better way to learn!

If you are looking for a good project for the team this year, building a set of adjustable headphone splitters or even a way for a central position to listen to any one of the radios would be a great addition to any station. You'll wonder why you never did it before.

Imagine, a simple thing like a two-buck Y-adapter! It may be the most important piece of equipment a potential contester could ever have!

73, Ward N0AX

CONTESTS

4 February through 17 February

An expanded, downloadable version of QST's Contest Corral in PDF format is available. Check the sponsor's Web site for information on operating time restrictions and other instructions.

HF CONTESTS

Vermont QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 7 0000Z to Feb 8 2400Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28, 50+ CW band edge+40 kHz; SSB lowest 25 kHz Gen band; VHF SSB 50.200/144.200; FM 146.69, 146.55. Exchange: RS(T) and VT county or S/P/C. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

Ten-Ten Winter Phone QSO Pty--Phone, from Feb 7 0001Z to Feb 8 2359Z. Bands (MHz):28 Exchange: Call sign, name, QTH, 10-10 number. Logs due: Feb 23. Rules

Worldwide Peace Messenger Cities--Phone,CW, from Feb 7 1200Z to Feb 8 1200Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28 Exchange: RS(T), serial, and PMC reference. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

Black Sea Cup International--Phone,CW, from Feb 7 1200Z to Feb 8 1200Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28 Exchange: RS(T) and organization ID or ITU zone. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

Minnesota QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 7 1400Z to Feb 7 2359Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28, 50+ CW 1.850, 3.550, 7.050, 14.050, 21.050, 28.050; SSB 1.870, 3.850, 7.250, 14.270, 21.350, 28.450. Exchange: Name and MN county or S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 15. Rules

FYBO Winter QRP Field Day--Phone,CW, from Feb 7 1400Z to Feb 7 2400Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28 Exchange: RS(T), S/P/C, name, power, temp in deg F. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

British Columbia QSO Challenge--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 7 1600Z to Feb 8 0359Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28, 50 CW 1.85, 3.55, 7.045, 14.05, 21.05, 28.05, 50.095; SSB 1.85, 3.825, 7.26, 14.225, 21.38, 28.38, 50.13. Exchange: RST and BC district or S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 7. Rules

Delaware QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 7 1700Z to Feb 8 0500Z and Feb 8 1300Z to Feb 9 0100Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28 CW 1.825, 3.55, 7.05, 14.05, 21.05, 28.05; SSB 1.86, 3.96, 7.26, 14.26, 21.36, 28.36; Digital per band plan. Exchange: RS(T) and DE county or S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 14. Rules

New Mexico QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 7 1700Z to Feb 8 2359Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28, 50 CW-1.85, 3.55, 7.045, 14.05, 21.05, 28.05, 50.095; SSB-1.85, 3.925, 7.26, 14.28, 21.38, 28.38, 50.13. Exchange: RS(T) and NM county or S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 1. Rules

XE Int'l RTTY Contest--Digital, from Feb 7 1800Z to Feb 8 1759Z. Bands (MHz):3.5-28 Exchange: RST and XE state/district or serial. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

North American Sprint--CW, from Feb 8 0000Z to Feb 8 0400Z. Bands (MHz):3.5-14 Exchange: Both call signs, serial, name, and S/P/C. Logs due: 7 days. Rules

School Club Roundup--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 9 1300Z to Feb 13 2400Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28, 50+ Exchange: RS(T), Class, S/P/C. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

Valentine's Day Sprint--Digital, from Feb 13 8 PM to Feb 14 2 AM. Bands (MHz):1.8-7 1.807, 3.580, 7.070/7.035 EU/7.028 JA. Exchange: Name, OM or YL, S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 6. Rules

YL-OM Contest--Phone, from Feb 13 1400Z to Feb 15 0200Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28 Exchange: Call sign, RST, serial and S/P/C. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

CQ WW RTTY WPX--Digital, from Feb 14 0000Z to Feb 15 2400Z. Bands (MHz):3.5-28 Exchange: RST and serial. Logs due: Mar 11. Rules

Northern New York QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 14 0000Z to Feb 15 2359Z. Bands (MHz):3.5-28, 50-432 CW band edge+40 kHz; SSB - lower 25 kHz Gen segment; VHF - 50.200,144.200,146.49. Exchange: RS(T) and NNY county or S/P/C. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

New Hampshire QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 14 0001Z to Feb 15 0001Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28, 50-1296 CW 1.81,band edge+35kHz; Phone 1.875, 3.935-950, 7.235, 14.28, 21.38, 28.39, 50.115, 144.205, 52.54, 146.55, 223.5, 446, 902.1, 1296.1. Exchange: RS(T) and NH county or S/P/C. Logs due: Fol'g Wed. Rules

Asia-Pacific Sprint--CW, from Feb 14 1100Z to Feb 14 1300Z. Bands (MHz):7,14 Exchange: RST, serial. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

Dutch PACC Contest--Phone,CW, from Feb 14 1200Z to Feb 15 1200Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28 Exchange: RS(T) and Dutch province or serial. Logs due: Mar 15. Rules

Louisana QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 14 1500Z to Feb 15 0300Z. Bands (MHz):3.5-28 CW 1.84, 3.54, 7.04, 14.04, 21.04, 28.04; Phone 1.865, 3.865, 7.255, 14.255, 21.365, 28.465; VHF 50.095, 50.135, 144.05, 144.21. Exchange: Call sign, RS(T), LA parish or S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 15. Rules

OMISS QSO Party--Phone, from Feb 14 1500Z to Feb 15 1500Z. Bands (MHz):3.5-28 Exchange: RS, S/P/C and OMISS nr or "DX". Logs due: Mar 31. Rules

FISTS CW Winter Sprint--CW, from Feb 14 1700Z to Feb 14 2100Z. Bands (MHz):3.5-28 Exchange: RST, S/P/C, first name, FISTS nr or power. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

RSGB 1.8 MHz Contest--CW, from Feb 14 2100Z to Feb 15 0100Z. Bands (MHz):1.8 Exchange: RST, serial, UK district. Logs due: Mar 15. Rules

North American Sprint--Phone, from Feb 15 0000Z to Feb 15 0400Z. Bands (MHz):3.5-14 Exchange: Both call signs, serial, name, and S/P/C. Logs due: 7 days. Rules

Classic Exchange--Phone, from Feb 15 1400Z to Feb 16 0800Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28, 50, 144 Exchange: RST, QTH, RX, TX. Logs due: Mar 15. Rules

VHF+ CONTESTS

Vermont QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 7 0000Z to Feb 8 2400Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28, 50+ CW band edge+40 kHz; SSB lowest 25 kHz Gen band; VHF SSB 50.200/144.200; FM 146.69, 146.55. Exchange: RS(T) and VT county or S/P/C. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

Minnesota QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 7 1400Z to Feb 7 2359Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28, 50+ CW 1.850, 3.550, 7.050, 14.050, 21.050, 28.050; SSB 1.870, 3.850, 7.250, 14.270, 21.350, 28.450. Exchange: Name and MN county or S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 15. Rules

British Columbia QSO Challenge--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 7 1600Z to Feb 8 0359Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28, 50 CW 1.85, 3.55, 7.045, 14.05, 21.05, 28.05, 50.095; SSB 1.85, 3.825, 7.26, 14.225, 21.38, 28.38, 50.13. Exchange: RST and BC district or S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 7. Rules

New Mexico QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 7 1700Z to Feb 8 2359Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28, 50 CW-1.85, 3.55, 7.045, 14.05, 21.05, 28.05, 50.095; SSB-1.85, 3.925, 7.26, 14.28, 21.38, 28.38, 50.13. Exchange: RS(T) and NM county or S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 1. RulesFM Simplex Contest--Phone, from Feb 8 1 PM to Feb 8 3:30PM. Bands (MHz):50-440 Exchange: Call sign and grid square. Logs due: Mar 9. Rules

School Club Roundup--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 9 1300Z to Feb 13 2400Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28, 50+ Exchange: RS(T), Class, S/P/C. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

Northern New York QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 14 0000Z to Feb 15 2359Z. Bands (MHz):3.5-28, 50-432 CW band edge+40 kHz; SSB - lower 25 kHz Gen segment; VHF - 50.200,144.200,146.49. Exchange: RS(T) and NNY county or S/P/C. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

New Hampshire QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 14 0001Z to Feb 15 0001Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28, 50-1296 CW 1.81,band edge+35kHz; Phone 1.875, 3.935-950, 7.235, 14.28, 21.38, 28.39, 50.115, 144.205, 52.54, 146.55, 223.5, 446, 902.1, 1296.1. Exchange: RS(T) and NH county or S/P/C. Logs due: Fol'g Wed. Rules

Classic Exchange--Phone, from Feb 15 1400Z to Feb 16 0800Z. Bands (MHz):1.8-28, 50, 144 Exchange: RST, QTH, RX, TX. Logs due: Mar 15. Rules

LOG DUE DATES

4 February through 17 February

February 6 - EUCW 160m Contest, email logs to: f6cel@wanadoo.fr, paper logs and diskettes to: Ghislain BARBASON, 5 rue de l'Ecluse, F-02190 PIGNICOURT, France. Rules

February 10 - MI QRP January CW Contest, email logs to: n8xx@arrl.net, paper logs and diskettes to: Hank Greeb, N8XX, 5727 11 Mile Rd NE, Rockford, MI 49341, USA. Rules

February 10 - PODXS 070 Club PSKFest, email logs to: jbudzowski@verizon.net, paper logs and diskettes to: Jay Budzowski, 070 Club PSKFest, 109 S Northview Ave, New Castle, PA 16102-1633, USA. Rules

February 15 - Midwinter Contest, CW, email logs to: jckoekkoek@home.nl, paper logs and diskettes to: PA3GQG, Contest Manager Midwinter Contest, Keulenheide 1, 6373 AP Landgraaf, The Netherlands. Rules

February 15 - Midwinter Contest, Phone, email logs to: jckoekkoek@home.nl, paper logs and diskettes to: PA3GQG, Contest Manager Midwinter Contest, Keulenheide 1, 6373 AP Landgraaf, The Netherlands. Rules

February 16 - LZ Open Contest, email logs to: LZ1GL@yahoo.com, paper logs and diskettes to: LZ Open Contest, PO Box 830, Sofia 1000, Bulgaria. Rules

February 17 - Hungarian DX Contest, email logs to: hadx@mrasz.axelero.net, paper logs and diskettes to: MRASZ, 1400 Budapest, PO Box 11, Hungary. Rules

February 17 - UK DX Contest, RTTY, email logs to: ukdxc@scotham.net, paper logs and diskettes to: UK DX RTTY Contest Committee, PO Box 7469, Glasgow, G42 0YD, Scotland UK. Rules

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

ARRL Contest Update wishes to acknowledge information from WA7BNM's Contest Calendar and SM3CER's Contest Calendar.

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