ARRL

Contest Update Issues

Preview
The ARRL Contest Update
February 3, 2010
Editor: Ward Silver, NØAX
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IN THIS ISSUE

NEW HF OPERATORS - THINGS TO DO

February is one of the busiest contest months, next to October, so you have lots to choose from! If you like fast-paced contests, try the North American Sprints. Digital enthusiasts can look forward to the CQ WPX RTTY - take a look at the NCCC Webinar on RTTY contesting and have at it. Or keep busy with any of the seven state or province QSO parties!

BULLETINS

While the new ARRL Web site is being prepared for release, online writeups for ARRL contests are being hosted off-site, thanks to the efforts of George K5TR and Trey N5KO. See the "Results and Records" section for details!

BUSTED QSOS

A golden issue last time!

CONTEST SUMMARY

Complete information for all contests follows the Conversation section

February 6-7

  • Vermont QSO Party
  • YLISSB QSO Party--CW
  • Ten-Ten Winter Phone QSO Party
  • Black Sea Cup International
  • Minnesota QSO Party
  • FYBO Winter QRP Field Day
  • Straight Key Party
  • British Columbia QSO Party
  • Delaware QSO Party
  • XE Int'l RTTY Contest,
  • North American Sprint--CW
  • New Mexico QSO Party
  • QRP Winter Fireside SSB Sprint

February 13-14

  • School Club Roundup
  • Valentine Sprint-- Digital
  • YL-OM Contest
  • CQ WW RTTY WPX
  • New Hampshire QSO Party
  • Asia-Pacific Sprint--CW
  • Worldwide Peace Messenger Cities
  • Dutch PACC Contest
  • Louisiana QSO Party
  • OMISS QSO Party--Phone
  • FISTS CW Winter Sprint
  • RSGB 1.8 MHz Contest--CW
  • North American Sprint--Phone
  • Classic Exchange--Phone
NEWS, PRESS RELEASES, AND GENERAL INTEREST

Next week is the February version of the School Club Roundup, running Monday through Friday, Feb 8th through the 12th. This is a great opportunity to spin the dial and hand out some contacts to beginning contesters. Speaking of spinning the dial, the Rookie Roundup - a brand-new ARRL contest aimed at newcomers - will be hitting the airwaves on April 18th from 1800 - 2359 UTC. (This is the SSB event - there will be a RTTY and CW version in August and December.) Like the Novice Roundup of old, experienced contesters are encouraged to get on and make operating fun for everybody. Unlike the old days, there's a new twist - this contest will be logged and scored entirely on-line! That's right - no waiting for results - and the results and certificates will be generated automatically. Stay tuned for further details and watch for March QST's "This Month In Contesting" by Sean KX9X.

What of the new Xtreme category in the CQ World-Wide? First announced at the Dayton Hamvention Contest Forum in 2009, the category attracted about a dozen participants split between CW and SSB. More Xtreme-ist stations have announced plans to enter this category in 2010, needing some time to develop software and hardware. This is in line with expectations of the CQ WW Committee for the first year. (Thanks, Doug K1DG)

The Florida Contest Group and Yaesu are pleased to present the very first FCG Contest SuperSuite in conjunction with the Orlando Hamcationsm on Friday, February 12 at 6 PM at the American Legion Hall just five miles away. Refreshments will be on hand, including the SuperSuite Standard free pizza and a CW copying contest with prizes. The winner of the FCG raffle will be announced and there will be a slide show on mobile operating in the Florida QSO Party, as well! (Thanks, Dan K1TO)

The CCF's "PileUP!" magazine gets better with every issue. Fear not the Finnish - you'll understand every photo!

The latest edition of PileUP! Magazine is available in PDF, says editor Ilkka OH1WZ. Articles in English cover topics such as B7P in CQ WW CW 2009 (OH7WV), SAC Workshop (SM6LRR), tips for succeeding in the Russian DX Contest (SM6LRR), Hope for the CC&R-Challenged (K6VVA and OH7WV), Contesting from Lithuania (LY9Y), Noob Contesting with Old-Timers (OH6MW), Tower Width (G6GO), and an update on Arctic Arcala (OH6KN). There are a lot of pictures, too! (Be advised that the KH6CG QSL on display therein is, um, tropical in nature.)

The Northern California Contest Club presents "RTTY Contesting for Newbies", another of their fine Webinars, this one concentrating on the practical aspects of getting your station up and running on RTTY. CQWW WPX RTTY and NAQP RTTY are both coming up in February. Make 2010 the year you stopped making excuses about why you can't be active in RTTY contests, says the club! Topics include RTTY fundamentals and interfaces, common problems, and demos of setting up MMTTY, N1MM, and Writelog software. The Webinar is presented by Dean N6DE, Iain N6ML, John K6MM, and Fred K6DGW. It's nearly two hours long and the video file is 115 Mbytes. (Thanks, Dean N6DE)

Co-hosted by the Potomac Valley Radio Club and the Northern California Contest Club, Bob N6TV will be featured in a repeat viewing of the popular Webinar "How To Operate the CW Sprint". This is very timely, since the North American CW Sprint is running on Saturday evening of this coming weekend.

Following a senatorial request to add more staff-level engineers, a new report from the General Accounting Office describes the "brain drain" at the FCC between 2003 and 2008. The report is discussed in a Slashdot news item for Jan 20. The FCC's public comment policy also comes in for some criticism. The background section of the report is also instructive as to the nature and structure of the FCC.

CQ ET DE EARTH - a history of messages intentionally beamed into space is recounted in this item on the New Scientist Web site. You might be, um, surprised at the nature of some of the messages, but given the human preoccupation with bodily functions, perhaps not so surprised. The first known such message was a 1679-bit burst blurted out by the Arecibo facility in 1974 towards the galaxy known as Messier Object M13 and it will arrive in the year 26,974. We'll leave the lights on.

How about CQ from within the Earth? QRZ.com carries this story about 16-year-old Andrew Kendrick and his International Science Fair-winning VLF data communications system. He uses it for communications from inside caves. There's a photo of Andrew and his antenna and links to other stories on the subject in the various comments.

In line with learning foreign ways to conduct our ham radio contacts, the New York Times discusses PC-based and online methods of learning languages. There are lots of options for learning how to have a short conversation! And even in a big pileup, a native "thank you" goes a long way!

The latest in the Creative Compendium's challenge for consecutive dits is contributed by Jeff VE3FRX with "RADISHES" (fifteen) and "FISH SHISH KEBABS" by Greg KG6AZX with 26 consecutive dits! I suppose there are no RADISH SHISH KEBABS or there would be a 27-ditter. Our original provocateur, Jerry VE6CNU wonders what word has the longest string of alternating dots and dashes, such as that in the middle of MARKET.

How about learning some Russian numbers this time?
zero -- nul
one -- odéen
two -- dva
three -- tree
four -- chetíreh
five -- pyat
six -- shest
seven -- sem
eight -- vósem
nine -- dévyat
ten -- désyat
You are pyat-dévyat, spacibo!

Web Site of the Week - With the largest full Moon of the year just past, here's link to free software for Moon observation: Virtual Moon Atlas. This software is the result of a collaboration between Christian Legrand, a passioned lunar observer, and co-author of the guide "Discover the Moon" (Cambridge University Press) and Patrick Chevalley, author of the freeware "Cartes du Ciel / Sky Charts". EME and meteor scatter enthusiasts will find both of these useful.

WORD TO THE WISE

For ground-plane builders, Bill W6WRT contributes this issue's words of wisdom - "RF energy is expensive to generate. Do not waste it by running it through dirt. Keep it up in the air where it belongs."

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SIGHTS AND SOUNDS

Most Thai hams can't get on HF because the license exams are not available, but Champ E21EIC and Thida HS1ASC have been working to bring competitive radio to Thailand. (Thanks, Fred K3ZO)

Here are some very interesting photos from Zone 18 during CQ WW in 1979. Many of you may remember working this loud multi-multi as UØY, UKØAMM or RKØAXX over the past 30 years. They are still very active today as RWØA. Here are some more from 1981 and 1982. The text is all in Cyrillic, but the photos speak a universal language. (Spacibo, James 9V1YC)

Here's a portable station idea - an inflatable satellite dish antenna currently being used by some of the relief agencies in Haiti. Contributor Dan AF7O wonders "what we could do with that for Field Day!"

This gives you an idea of just how many E2 and HS call signs are having a good time with radiosport! (Thanks, Fred K3ZO)

Have fun building your code speed while listening to a classic work of fiction, "Alice in Wonderland" by Lewis Carroll. Just the ticket for those long drives, you can choose from 25 or 40 wpm. Feed your head, indeed! (Thanks, Glenn WØGJ)

With the improved and expanded graphics capabilities of the new ARRL Web site, Contest Branch Manager, Sean KX9X, would love to get more photos and graphics from contesters at all levels, HF, VHF, EME, anything! The more, the merrier! All he needs is a list of people in the photo, who took it, and your understanding that the ARRL may use it in various print and online publications.

RESULTS AND RECORDS

It seems that we just sent in the logs, but 2009 ARRL November Sweepstakes results are already online, including the Club Competition! Click on "Initial Results" for a PDF of the final results and the line scores. The searchable database, Log-Checking Reports and in-depth writeup will still be published on the usual schedule in QST and in expanded form on the Web. The effort to turn the scores around quickly was a great success and a big thank you is extended to the log-checkers and paper log data entry volunteers. Due to an error in the Club database, the Northern Rockies DX Association was mistakenly listed as the winner of the Local Club category in the 2009 ARRL November Sweepstakes. The correct Local Club winner is the Spokane DX Association. (Thanks, ARRL Contest Branch Manager, Sean KX9X)

Other contest results are online, too - The 2009 ARRL September VHF QSO Party and 2009 ARRL 10 GHz & Up contest packages are available in PDF, too. Click "Results (QST)" to download the file, complete with sidebars, tables, and extensive commentary by the authors.

2009 ARRL January VHF Sweepstakes certificates have been mailed, somewhat late, but they are on their way. Reminder - this is the Last Call for 2009 Sweepstakes Clean Sweep mugs and pins from ARRL HQ. No orders will be accepted after Friday, Feb 5th.

Congratulations on a very nice switch-hitting job in the 2009 CQ WW by double-mode Top Ten operators W2SC (as 8P5A), OH2UA (as CR2X), and K9NW (as HT2N on SSB and A25NW on CW)!

CQ WPX Director, Randy K5ZD has led a volunteer team in the creation of an online database with all line scores for WPX SSB from 1985 to 2008 and for WPX CW from 1991 to 2008. He thanks the team of N7AZ, WP3C, SV1RP, AB7E, KA3DRR, N1NK, K4ZW, NN3W and KQ2M for their hard work in making this information for the rest of us.

OPERATING TIP

Know the codes - postal codes, that is! A lot of new contesters are dismayed to find big score reductions in domestic contest because they didn't use the right abbreviations for the states. You can find the codes for all fifty states and every US possession online from the USPS Web site. If you are an experienced operator hosting some new hams, be sure they know when to use which of ME-MD-MA-MI-MN-MS-MO-MT since it's not exactly obvious.

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TECHNICAL TOPICS AND INFORMATION

The Double Half Delta Loop (DHD) receiving antenna used by the impressive TX3A expedition is described in an downloadable ZIP file of material and also on IV3PRK's Web site where Luis describes additional developments to this simple, yet effective low-band antenna. (Thanks, Neil GØJHC and Jacek SP5DRH)

Mentioned in the K9LA Webinar hosted by the Potomac Valley Radio Club last August are a couple of interesting articles by on 160 meter propagation; "The 160-Meter Band: An Enigma Shrouded in Mystery" by Oler and Cohen (N4XX) and "Ducting and Spotlight Propagation on 160m" by K9LA. (Thanks, Tony NC4AS)

It is traditional that the previous WRTC champs are invited back to the next WRTC and here are winners Jim VE7ZO (L) and John VE3EJ (R). Next to Jim is Joaquim PP5JY and next to John is Jun JH4RHF. (Thanks, John VE3EJ)

A nice pair of articles by KØFF appeared recently on the eham.net Web site. First is an article on building impedance transformers for Beverage antennas with lots of photos and detailed instructions. The second is a variation of the 5/8-wavelength 40 meter vertical design in ON4UN's "Low Band DXing" book. Good reading!

Dealing effectively with EMI and building transmission line components requires just the right type of ferrite. Once you know the manufacturer's part numbers you'll need to find a distributor, unless you want to order in large quantities. Mouser Electronics carries many of the Fair-Rite parts under "EMI/RFI Components". Ferroxcube is distributed by Elna Magnetics and that company also carries Fair-Rite. Kits and Parts by W8DIZ is a good source of both powdered-iron and ferrite cores with T- and FT- part numbers, as well as the vaunted W3NQN filters and other products. (Thanks, John K5PRO and Gary K4FMX)

The Ford EMC booklet being available on the Repeater-Builder Web site was mentioned in the Jan 20 issue of this newsletter. Mike WA6ILQ wrote to let you know that you can also find Chrysler and GM EMI information on the site.

When you need circuit design ideas it is usually time to hit the books, but if you don't have a huge library on hand, how about the Potluck Circuit Database? Another good on-line circuit resource is the CircuitsArchive Web site. Don't forget to contribute your own favorite circuits, too!

I found a neat idea for the beginning and intermediate builder, Circuit Stickers that provide a circuit layout for prototyping PCBs and solderless breadboards. They are available from Indiana Kits along with actual kits and other goodies.

Jim K9YC reminds us not to confuse phase shift with time delay. For example, a length of transmission line is often referred to as a phase-shifting element, but the line only provides a specific number of degrees of phase shift at one frequency. A length of line is more accurately viewed as providing time delay, instead.

As we convert to lead-free soldering, flux will become more important. Writing on the QRP-L reflector, veteran builder Chuck W5USJ recommends NoKorode Regular Paste Flux made by Rectorseal. It's designed for lead-free solder but he finds that it works well for lead-tin solders, too. It works particularly well on nickel-plated connectors such as RCA and other audio styles.

Resources for dealing with RFI to and from the dreaded touch-lamps are presented on a dedicated ARRL Technical Information Service page. QST also ran several articles on the problem: May 1985, Jan 1986, Jan 1993, May 1993, Feb 1995, Apr 1995, and Jun 1997 - all are available through the online QST Archives for ARRL members. (Thanks, Gene AD3F)

You might want to bookmark the Web site that lists the numerous ways to use the Google search page for targeted searches. The list includes everything from package tracking to a "fill in the blank" page I occasionally find pretty handy. A great diversion is watching the earthquake locations - lots is shaking in West Yellowstone, lately!

Technical Web Site of the Week - If you need to link GPS data with field measurements such as noise levels, Pete N4ZR suggests trying the free GPS Visualizer software. The list of example maps on the site should really pique your interest!

CONVERSATION

Siren Songs

In this issue, I attempt a duet with Kirk K4RO on the theme of logging accuracy and two common reasons for its downfall; reliance on databases and lack of sleep. Kirk will begin and then I'll chime in with refrains from "Can O' Bull Red", miscopied in its own right from the Peter Rowan classic "Panama Red". See you in the pileups!

(K4RO) For years now (a decade or more) I used a Super Check Partial database made up of only the call signs that I have worked from my station. I was aware of the publicly available databases, but I found that they contained call signs that I never heard or worked. So I stuck to my own self-generated SCP, hoping to keep the mistakes down.

Can o' Bull Red, can o' Bull Red
The mults will call from right inside your head!
Can o' Bull Red, can o' Bull Red
On his black horse, Dos Espresso
He'll take your golden log right down
Your relief op's still in bed
Needs a swig from a can o' Bull Red

Once the exchange look-up feature became available in TR-Log, I used it. I figured my competitors were, so I better get with it. Again, I only used data from my own contest activity. Since I was very active, my look-up databases were well populated. I was convinced that they were saving me considerable keystrokes.

Checkers know Bull Red's been downed
Calls get busted, NILs are found
But the ops have gone rate crazy
Taking guesses all around
My Elmer said, "Hey, Bozo,
Call CQ, don't search and pounce!"
Nobody sits still after
Can o' Bull Red gets passed around

However, I came to find over the years that those saved keystrokes came at a cost. I would get lazy or tired, and just accept what was already in the call sign window -- without really verifying what I had heard. This was especially true if QRM or the second radio was covering up the signal. My error rates did NOT improve as a result.

Can o' Bull Red, can o' Bull Red
The mults will call from right inside your head!
Can o' Bull Red, can o' Bull Red
On his black horse, Dos Espresso
He'll take your golden log right down
Your relief op's still in bed
Needs a swig from a can o' Bull Red

I also found that the pre-fill data distracted me from my main reason for being on the radio -- which was paying my attention to the audio stream in my ears, and not the visual input from the computer. It literally degraded my copying skills through distraction.

Everybody's looking out for him
'Cause they know Red opens eyes
Tired ops love to pull calls from
The noise and log sweet lies
But when the pileup gets confusing, buddy
You're better off in bed
Instead of searching in the fridge upstairs for
A can o' Bull Red

Since that time I've used the pre-fills less, and enjoyed operating more. It was kind of like learning to find DX again on my own, after falling into the seductive trap of having others do it for me during the early packet era. They don't allow pre-fill databases at WRTC, and I suspect some reasoned thought went into that decision.

Can o' Bull Red, can o' Bull Red
The mults will call from right inside your head!
Can o' Bull Red, can o' Bull Red
On his black horse, Dos Espresso
He'll take your golden log right down
Your relief op's still in bed
Needs a swig from a can o' Bull Red

Bottom line - copy the stuff yourself, and don't be fooled by the lure of the pre-fill database. It won't help you become a better operator, and it probably won't help your score either in the long run.

73, Ward NØAX and Kirk K4RO

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CONTESTS

February 3 through February 16, 2010

An expanded, downloadable version of QST's Contest Corral in PDF format is available. Check the sponsor's Web site for information on operating time restrictions and other instructions.

HF CONTESTS

Vermont QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 6, 0000Z to Feb 7, 2400Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28, 50+, Frequencies: CW band edge+40 kHz; SSB lowest 25 kHz Gen band; VHF SSB 50.200/144.200; FM 146.69, 146.55. Exchange: RS(T) and VT county or S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 7. Rules

YLISSB QSO Party--CW, from Feb 6, 0000Z to Feb 7, 0000Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28. Exchange: Call sign, RS(T), ISSB number. Logs due: Mar 19. Rules

Ten-Ten Winter Phone QSO Party--Phone, from Feb 6, 0001Z to Feb 7, 2359Z. Bands (MHz): 28. Exchange: Call sign, name, QTH, 10-10 number. Logs due: Feb 22. Rules

Black Sea Cup International--Phone,CW, from Feb 6, 1200Z to Feb 7, 1200Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28. Exchange: RS(T) and org'n ID, member nr or ITU zone. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

Minnesota QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 6, 1400Z to Feb 6, 2359Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28, 50+, Frequencies: CW 1.850, 3.550, 7.050, 14.050, 21.050, 28.050; SSB 1.870, 3.850, 7.250, 14.270, 21.350, 28.450. Exchange: Name and MN county or S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 15. Rules

FYBO Winter QRP Field Day--Phone,CW, from Feb 6, 1400Z to Feb 6, 2400Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28. Exchange: RS(T), S/P/C, name, power, temp in deg F. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

Straight Key Party--CW, from Feb 6, 1600Z to Feb 6, 1900Z. Bands (MHz): 3.5,7. Exchange: RST, serial, category, name, age. Logs due: Feb 28. Rules

British Columbia QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 6, 1600Z to Feb 7, 0759Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28, 50, Frequencies: CW 1.85, 3.55, 7.045,14.05, 21.05 ,28.05, 50.095; SSB 1.85, 3.825, 7.26, 14.225, 21.38, 28.38, 50.13. Exchange: RST and BC district or S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 31. Rules

Delaware QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 6, 1700Z to Feb 7, 2359Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28, 50+, Frequencies: CW 1.825, 3.55, 7.05, 14.05, 21.05 ,28.05, 50.95; SSB 1.86, 3.96, 7.26, 14.26, 21.36, 28.36, 50.135; Digital per band plan. Exchange: RS(T) and DE county or S/P/C. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

XE Int'l RTTY Contest--Digital, from Feb 6, 1800Z to Feb 7, 1759Z. Bands (MHz): 3.5-28. Exchange: RST and XE state/district or serial. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

North American Sprint--CW, from Feb 7, 0000Z to Feb 7, 0400Z. Bands (MHz): 3.5-14. Exchange: Both call signs, serial, name, and S/P/C. Logs due: 7 days. Rules

New Mexico QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 7, 1500Z to Feb 8, 0300Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28, 50, Frequencies: CW-1.85, 3.55, 7.045, 14.05, 21.05, 28.05, 50.095; SSB-1.85, 3.925, 7.26, 14.28, 21.38, 28.38, 50.13.Exchange: Call sign, name, and NM county or S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 1. Rules

QRP Winter Fireside SSB Sprint--Phone, from Feb 7, 2000Z to Feb 7, 2359Z. Bands (MHz): 3.5-28. Frequencies: 3.865, 7.285, 14.285, 21.385, 28.385. Exchange: RS, S/P/C, QRP ARCI number or power. Logs due: Mar 8. Rules

School Club Roundup--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 8, 1300Z to Feb 12, 2400Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28, 50+. Exchange: RS(T), Class, S/P/C. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

Valentine Sprint--Digital, from Feb 12, 8 PM to Feb 13, 2 AM. Bands (MHz): 1.8-7. Frequencies: 1.807,3.580,7.070/7.035 EU/7.028 JA. Exchange: Name, OM or YL, S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 5. Rules

YL-OM Contest--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 12, 1400Z to Feb 14, 0200Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28. Exchange: Call sign, RST, serial and S/P/C. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

CQ WW RTTY WPX--Digital, from Feb 13, 0000Z to Feb 14, 2400Z. Bands (MHz): 3.5-28. Exchange: RST and serial. Logs due: Mar 1. Rules

New Hampshire QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 13, 0001Z to Feb 14, 0001Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28, 50-1296, Frequencies: CW 1.81,band edge+35kHz;Phone 1.875,3.935-950, 7.235, 14.28, 21.38, 28.39, 50.115, 144.205,52.54,146.55,223.5,446,902.1,1296.1. Exchange: RS(T) and NH county or S/P/C. Logs due: Fol'g Wed. Rules

Asia-Pacific Sprint--CW, from Feb 13, 1100Z to Feb 13, 1300Z. Bands (MHz): 7,14. Exchange: RST, serial. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

Worldwide Peace Messenger Cities--Phone,CW, from Feb 13, 1200Z to Feb 14, 1200Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28. Exchange: RS(T), serial, PMC ref number or CQ zone. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

Dutch PACC Contest--Phone,CW, from Feb 13, 1200Z to Feb 14, 1200Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28. Exchange: RS(T) and Dutch province or serial. Logs due: Mar 15. Rules

Louisiana QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 13, 1500Z to Feb 14, 0300Z. Bands (MHz): 3.5-28. Frequencies: CW 1.84, 3.54, 7.04, 14.04, 21.04, 28.04; Phone 1.865, 3.865, 7.255, 14.255, 21.365, 28.465; VHF 50.095, 50.135, 144.05, 144.21. Exchange: Call sign, RS(T), LA parish or S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 15. Rules

OMISS QSO Party--Phone, from Feb 13, 1500Z to Feb 14, 1500Z. Bands (MHz): 3.5-28. Exchange: RS, S/P/C and OMISS nr or "DX". Logs due: Mar 30. Rules

FISTS CW Winter Sprint--CW, from Feb 13, 1700Z to Feb 13, 2100Z. Bands (MHz): 3.5-28. Exchange: RST, S/P/C, first name, FISTS nr or power. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

RSGB 1.8 MHz Contest--CW, from Feb 13, 2100Z to Feb 14, 0100Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8. Exchange: RST, serial, UK district. Logs due: Dec 6. Rules

North American Sprint--Phone, from Feb 14, 0000Z to Feb 14, 0400Z. Bands (MHz): 3.5-14. Exchange: Both call signs, serial, name, and S/P/C. Logs due: 7 days. Rules

Classic Exchange--Phone, from Feb 14, 1400Z to Feb 15, 0800Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28, 50,144, Frequencies: AM--1.890,3.880,7.160,7.290,14.286,21.420,29.000,50.400,144.300; SSB--1.885,3.870,7.280,14.270,21.370,28.390,50.125,144.200. Exchange: RST, QTH, model of rcvr and xmtr. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

VHF+ CONTESTS

Vermont QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 6, 0000Z to Feb 7, 2400Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28, 50+, Frequencies: CW band edge+40 kHz; SSB lowest 25 kHz Gen band; VHF SSB 50.200/144.200; FM 146.69, 146.55. Exchange: RS(T) and VT county or S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 7. Rules

Minnesota QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 6, 1400Z to Feb 6, 2359Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28, 50+, Frequencies: CW 1.850, 3.550, 7.050, 14.050, 21.050, 28.050; SSB 1.870, 3.850, 7.250, 14.270, 21.350, 28.450. Exchange: Name and MN county or S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 15. Rules

British Columbia QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 6, 1600Z to Feb 7, 0759Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28, 50, Frequencies: CW 1.85, 3.55, 7.045,14.05, 21.05 ,28.05, 50.095; SSB 1.85, 3.825, 7.26, 14.225, 21.38, 28.38, 50.13. Exchange: RST and BC district or S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 31. Rules

Delaware QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 6, 1700Z to Feb 7, 2359Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28, 50+, Frequencies: CW 1.825, 3.55, 7.05, 14.05, 21.05 ,28.05, 50.95; SSB 1.86, 3.96, 7.26, 14.26, 21.36, 28.36, 50.135; Digital per band plan. Exchange: RS(T) and DE county or S/P/C. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

New Mexico QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 7, 1500Z to Feb 8, 0300Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28, 50, Frequencies: CW-1.85, 3.55, 7.045, 14.05, 21.05, 28.05, 50.095; SSB-1.85, 3.925, 7.26, 14.28, 21.38, 28.38, 50.13.Exchange: Call sign, name, and NM county or S/P/C. Logs due: Mar 1. Rules

School Club Roundup--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 8, 1300Z to Feb 12, 2400Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28, 50+. Exchange: RS(T), Class, S/P/C. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

New Hampshire QSO Party--Phone,CW,Digital, from Feb 13, 0001Z to Feb 14, 0001Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28, 50-1296, Frequencies: CW 1.81,band edge+35kHz;Phone 1.875,3.935-950, 7.235, 14.28, 21.38, 28.39, 50.115, 144.205,52.54,146.55,223.5,446,902.1,1296.1. Exchange: RS(T) and NH county or S/P/C. Logs due: Fol'g Wed. Rules

Classic Exchange--Phone, from Feb 14, 1400Z to Feb 15, 0800Z. Bands (MHz): 1.8-28, 50,144, Frequencies: AM--1.890,3.880,7.160,7.290,14.286,21.420,29.000,50.400,144.300; SSB--1.885,3.870,7.280,14.270,21.370,28.390,50.125,144.200. Exchange: RST, QTH, model of rcvr and xmtr. Logs due: 30 days. Rules

LOG DUE DATES

February 3 through February 16, 2010

February 4 - ARS Spartan Sprint, email logs to: spartansprint@yahoo.com, paper logs and diskettes to: (none). Rules

February 5 - EUCW 160m Contest, email logs to: f6cel@wanadoo.fr, paper logs and diskettes to: Ghislain BARBASON, 5 rue de l'Ecluse, F-02190 PIGNICOURT, France. Rules

February 8 - RSGB 80m Club Championship, SSB, email logs to: ccssb.logs@rsgbhfcc.org, upload log at: http://www.vhfcc.org/cgi-bin/hfenter.pl, paper logs and diskettes to: (none). Rules

February 9 - PODXS 070 Club PSKFest, email logs to: jbudzowski@verizon.net, paper logs and diskettes to: Jay Budzowski, 070 Club PSKFest, 109 S. Northview Ave., New Castle, PA 16102-1633, USA. Rules

February 9 - MI QRP January CW Contest, email logs to: n8xx@arrl.net, paper logs and diskettes to: Hank Greeb, N8XX, 5727 11 Mile Rd. NE, Rockford, MI 49341, USA. Rules

February 9 - WW PMC Contest, email logs to: pmc@s59dcd.si, paper logs and diskettes to: (none). Rules

February 15 - Midwinter Contest, CW, email logs to: jckoekkoek@home.nl, paper logs and diskettes to: PA3GQG, Contest Manager Midwinter Contest, Keulenheide 1, 6373 AP Landgraaf, The Netherlands. Rules

February 15 - Midwinter Contest, Phone, email logs to: jckoekkoek@home.nl, paper logs and diskettes to: PA3GQG, Contest Manager Midwinter Contest, Keulenheide 1, 6373 AP Landgraaf, The Netherlands. Rules

February 16 - Hungarian DX Contest, email logs to: hadx@mrasz.axelero.net, paper logs and diskettes to: MRASZ, 1400 Budapest, P.O. Box 11, Hungary. Rules

February 16 - UK DX Contest, RTTY, email logs to: ukdxc@scotham.net, paper logs and diskettes to: UK DX RTTY Contest Committee, P.O. Box 7469, Glasgow, G42 0YD, Scotland UK. Rules

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

ARRL Contest Update wishes to acknowledge information from WA7BNM's Contest Calendar and SM3CER's Contest Calendar.

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