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Reversed text for practice legal?

Feb 10th, 19:10

NQ8Z

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
Ordinary text is easy to copy because words in the text are familiar and characters can be guessed. Sending reversed text is a better challenge for a beginner. The reversed text of

JACK AND JILL WENT UP THE HILL.

is

.LLIH EHTPU TNEWL LIJDN AKCAJ

Is it permissible to send reversed text during on-the-air code practice or is it considered encrypted?

Chris
NQ8Z




Feb 11th, 16:08

AA6E

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
Chris -
I am not a lawyer, and this forum is not a place to get reliable legal advice. That said, I think it's an interesting question. The relevant FCC reg seems to be in 97.113:

(4) Music using a phone emission except as specifically provided elsewhere in this section; communications intended to facilitate a criminal act; messages encoded for the purpose of obscuring their meaning, except as otherwise provided herein; obscene or indecent words or language; or false or deceptive messages, signals or identification.

It seems to come down to intent -- are you trying to hide something. Reversed text seems harmless by this test. How about other possibilities, like random code groups? If they are "meaningless", I suppose it's ok. But how do you distinguish meaningless groups from encrypted traffic? Encrypted text generally looks like random code groups! So you might have a hard time with random text.

I doubt you'll ever get the ARRL, a lawyer, a judge, or the FCC ever to say that reversed text is "no problem". It's a question of how much legal risk you're willing to take.

Maybe you could send something in an unfamiliar language?

73 Martin AA6E

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