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Parts List Entry for Hand Wound Magnetics

Mar 7th 2015, 20:10

WN8P

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
I'm not sure this is the correct forum, but it is as close as it comes to the topic. This is not a question, but is a statement of information, which I would hope that the ARRL and authors would follow. You have all seen an entry in a parts list (PL) like "L1 23T #22 wire on an FT-243 toroid core, followed by manufacturer's name and manufacturer's part number of the toroid only". Implementing the Unit Numbering Method of assigning reference designators here is the better way:
L1 Inductor, 23T 70 ┬ÁH
L1E1 Toroid Core, Amidon FT-243
L1W1 Wire, 22 AWG Enameled, Belden #XXXX, Length
In this fashion all of the items, in this case 2, that make up L1 are completely and fully identified.

73 de 9V1MI/WN8P Larry
Mar 8th 2015, 06:07

WA9WVX

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
Hello Larry,

What you are describing is a Bill Of Material Break Down Chart often used by major manufactures that provides a high level component number and then the actual parts used in the high level part. I've also seen it listed as a Kit, Assembly Number and Part Numbers that are required. I believe what you want is for the ARRL to instruct anyone writing an article to use a Standard Bill Of Material used in their Design. There are software programs that can do this function but they're not inexpensive and then the ARRL would be required to provide a Standard Format for each type of a Component, Assembly and Kit that eventually get soldered to a PC Board.

Dan
WA9WVX
Mar 9th 2015, 01:11

WN8P

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
Hi Dan,
Thanks for your comments. This is the first time I have heard the term, "Break Down Chart". These are generally called subassemblies. Subassemblies could be a PCBA attached to a PCBA, a wire or cable assembly/subassembly, or even a programmable part that is programmed before mounting to a PCB.

I don't know what you mean by "Standard Bill of Material" or that the ARRL would be required to provide a "Standard Format". You simply do an expansion of the existing parts list (PL). When designing a project you're going to produce an engineering, or design, PL for each assembly/subassembly, derived from schematic diagrams and with reference designator prefixes assigned, as necessary, according to your system subdivision diagram. Then you combine like parts into a manufacturing, or purchasing, PL. I use a spreadsheet to make the engineering PL and then do a sort to see how many of each part I need along with the reference designators. I then take that information and enter it into P&V6.0 for the manufacturing/purchasing PL. I know of no database program where this is automatic, unless, as you say, there are very costly programs that have this capability.

Kits are from the manufacturing point of view and may be made up of an entire ASSY or may be a subset of an ASSY. The point of view that I am talking about is from engineering or design where you are presenting the information such that the UNIT may be duplicated by others.

Further discussion?

73 de 9V1MI/WN8P, Larry
Mar 11th 2015, 02:16

WA9WVX

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
Larry,

I use to do what was called a Bill Of Material or BOM that broke down the Option, Kit, Assembly Number and Piece Parts for in house manufacturing, then I also wrote special instructions for the factory to build these Assemblies and Kits and if the Kits were sold as Options for the Technical People out in the field then I would be required to write a Field Modification Manual that would accompany the Option & Kit. For the life of me I just can't remember what software package was loaded into the computer for performing this function. I was employed in Engineering at Motorola in Schaumburg, Illinois at the time.

Dan
WA9WVX

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