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Building the Loop Skywire Antenna

Feb 1st 2018, 13:26

K9FNN

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
Reference: The Loop Skywire article written by Dave Fisher, W0MHS in November 1985 QST

The author show the 80 meter Loop Skywire antenna having a total loop perimeter of 272 feet with each side being 68 feet. I live in the country and have room to put up a larger perimeter Loop Skywire antenna. Is there a performance advantage to be gained by doubling the perimeter of the antenna to 544 feet with each side being 136 feet? Thanks for any input given.

Feb 2nd 2018, 12:37

W1VT

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
Maybe, maybe not. I personally avoid overly large wire antennas because I like to know where my signal is going. A really big antenna get gain in some directions at the expense of others. Since it is rarely practical to precisely model where you signal is going, it can be really hit or miss if you are looking to work a particular direction.

My preference, is possible is to use three dipoles in different directions to cover the globe. Perhaps up to the gain of an EDZ toward a major population center like Europe. Or a much needed DXCC counter like Bouvet. Needed countries now come up so infrequently that is is entirely practical for me to re-string antennas between optimally located trees in my backyard to work such rare DX.

Zak Lau W1VT
ARRL Senior Lab Engineer
Feb 5th 2018, 08:35

K9FNN

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
Zak, thank you very much for your insights about my question. Think I will just go back to the author's original design and see how it works at my qth. My problem is that in West Texas trees big enough to hang antennas from are rare. So, I will have to erect wire supports no matter the antenna configuration. Thanks, Howard
Feb 5th 2018, 19:15

W1VT

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
Yes, I went to a Central States VHF conference in Kerrville Texas. Lots of short trees on the way out there. You may want to consider an Inverted-L, which may perform adequately with one high support, Inverted-Ls are easy to feed efficiently with remote tuners mounted at the feedpoint. I'd get the support mast as far away from the house as is practical and then run the wire up the mast and then off to a convenient tree. Or back to the house as a last resort.

Zak W1VT
ARRL Senior Lab Engineer

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