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Ft-897 Battery Cable

Jan 6th 2013, 18:06

TechJuan

Joined: Dec 30th 2012, 08:00
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
Hello, I would like to take advantage of the low power consumption of the Yaesu FT-897 while using batteries. But, do not want to use the internal batteries. In other words. I like to power the radio through the Batt. plug and not through the 13.5v power connector.

Could I make a power cable to connect to an outside battery, such as seal lead?

Would a different Amp Hour rating would damage the radio?

Thank you.
Jan 6th 2013, 21:32

W1VT

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0

http://www.eham.net/articles/4114
You may find this FT-897 modification article by Stephen W4CNG to be helpful.

More battery capacity is useful, but the heavy weight of big batteries is an issue for many hams. A small battery pack may run down too fast to be useful for transmit--but everyone's needs are different.

Zack W1VT
ARRL Senior Lab Engineer
Jan 7th 2013, 23:43

AA6E

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
I have an '897 here, and I've been looking through the manual. Do you have some reason to think that running with the internal battery connection takes lower power?

I don't see that, though it may be an undocumented feature. (There is a "battery" indicator on the LCD, so the rig does know that it's on batteries.) I suspect it will work the same if you connect the main DC power input to your batteries. If you want to save battery power for longer life, you have to reduce the transmit power level using the normal menu settings.

The Yaesu internal batteries make a nice package, but they seem to be rather expensive compared to standard batteries.

You can connect as many amp-hours capacity as you like. It's just a question of battery lifetime per charge, vs weight. The radio only cares about the voltage.

73 Martin AA6E
Jan 29th 2013, 05:47

TechJuan

Joined: Dec 30th 2012, 08:00
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
Quote by AA6E
I have an '897 here, and I've been looking through the manual. Do you have some reason to think that running with the internal battery connection takes lower power?

I don't see that, though it may be an undocumented feature. (There is a "battery" indicator on the LCD, so the rig does know that it's on batteries.) I suspect it will work the same if you connect the main DC power input to your batteries. If you want to save battery power for longer life, you have to reduce the transmit power level using the normal menu settings.

The Yaesu internal batteries make a nice package, but they seem to be rather expensive compared to standard batteries.

You can connect as many amp-hours capacity as you like. It's just a question of battery lifetime per charge, vs weight. The radio only cares about the voltage.

73 Martin AA6E

Thank you. You are right, reducing the power would have the same result. I was just trying something different.

I am trying to get away with using an external cheaper battery, to be part of a go box I am building.

My box is going to be capable of running on Solar or AC (power supply). As soon as I figure out how to connect the solar controller and the PWRgate PG-40s to the same battery.

I wanted to eliminate the power supply out of the equation. Thanks to all the responses.
Jan 29th 2013, 18:43

KB0HAE

Joined: Apr 4th 1998, 00:00
Total Topics: 0
Total Posts: 0
Hi. You will probably need a switch to switch between the solar and power supply. I guess I don't see the advantage of the PWRgate PG-40s, as it will gharge the battery, but will not power the radio from AC power without a connected power supply. Most Gel cell batteries can be float charged directly from a 13.8v power supply. You may need a diode between the battery and power supply to keep from damaging the power supply when its off, or keep it from draining the battery.

I would include a switching power supply, as they are small and light-weight.

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