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FCC Seeks Public's Help in Reform Effort

01/08/2010

According to its chairman, the Federal Communications Commission wants to change the way it is seen by the American public. In order to further that effort, on January 7, FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski announced that the Commission has launched a new Web site -- Reboot.FCC.gov-- saying it is the first-ever Web site dedicated to soliciting public input on ways to improve citizen interaction with the FCC, "creating a forum where the public can participate in improving the FCC."

Genachowski called the newly launched Web site as "a site dedicated to public education and discussion on how we can continue to improve our operations, both online and offline, here at the FCC. This effort is consistent with the President's Open Government directive, creating a forum where the public can participate in improving the FCC."

Saying that transforming the Commission into "a model of excellence in government" is one of his top priorities, Genachowski said that "the success of this transformation depends on strong public participation throughout the process. With the launch of Reboot.FCC.gov, our goal is to get input from all corners of the country on ways to improve usability, accessibility and transparency across the agency."

To advance the FCC reform agenda, Genachowski said he has appointed a team of senior leadership from within the agency "dedicated to identifying the most needed and important areas for improvement." The Reboot.FCC.gov Web site highlights five key elements of FCC reform for public discussion and feedback: 

  • Redesign of the FCC Web site: As part of a long-overdue redesign of the FCC's Web site, the FCC is asking for ideas on how best to streamline and improve the experience for all site visitors.
  • Data: Because data underlies all agency proceedings, the FCC is launching another Web site -- FCC.gov/data -- an online clearinghouse for the Commission's public data. The Commission is also looking for additional ways increase openness, transparency, efficiency and public oversight.
  • Engagement: The FCC is reevaluating how citizens engage in government and is exploring new ways to increase public participation through the use of new media tools, e-rulemaking and expanding their audiences.
  • Systems: The FCC is overhauling and reforming the systems available on the FCC's Web site, from the Electronic Comment Filing System to creating a Consolidated Licensing System. They want feedback on ways to make them easier to navigate and more useful.
  • Rules and Processes: The FCC aims to modernize and grow the efficiency of agency proceedings, and seeks input on ways to improve the quality of agency decision-making, reduce backlogs and enhance the public's ability to understand and participate in Commission proceedings. 

According to the Chairman, the new Web site boasts the first FCC-wide blog, online workshops on the Commission's reform agenda and "the first edition of new tools to increase transparency and access to public data. Most importantly, you'll find many opportunities to share your ideas and insights on how we can continually improve the FCC. I encourage ever one of you to contribute to the site."



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