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  • 01/02/2009 | The K7RA Solar Update

    2008 was a year of very low solar activity. More than 40 percent of this year's propagation bulletins reported zero sunspots for their respective weeks. The average daily sunspot number for the year was 4.7; in 2007, it was 12.8. The yearly averages of da
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  • 12/12/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    Finally! A sunspot group appeared this week, about three weeks since the last group disappeared. The first spotless day after sunspot group 1008's last appearance was Tuesday, November 18; the last spotless day before group 1009 emerged was Tuesday, Decem
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  • 11/26/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    This is an early bulletin for the Thanksgiving holiday, as ARRL is closed on Friday, the regular day for release of this bulletin. We plan another brief regular propagation bulletin on Monday, December 1 that will contain the propagation numbers for Novem
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  • 11/07/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    Sunspot 1007 is still there, but probably rotating off the visible solar disk sometime today. This is the eighth sunspot of the new solar cycle -- and also the largest. Sunspot numbers for October 30-November 5 were 13, 16, 16, 17, 18, 14 and 11 with a me
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  • 10/31/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    Solar Cycle 24 is slowly building momentum. We saw sunspots for eight days in a row -- October 10-17 -- then 12 days of no spots. Another sunspot -- number 1007 -- appeared on October 30 from Solar Cycle 24. It is a high latitude sunspot and may provide s
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  • 10/24/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    Visible sunspots continued last week for eight days straight, the longest continuous period of sunspot visibility since the 12 days of March 23April 3 last year. Sunspot numbers for October 16-22 were 24, 11, 0, 0, 0, 0 and 0 with a mean of 5. The 10.7 cm
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  • 10/17/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    Finally, we are seeing Solar Cycle 24 sunspots that don't emerge on one day, only to evaporate the next. That's right -- sunspots, as in two or more. On Friday, October 10, sunspot 1005 emerged at high latitude over our Sun's eastern limb; that day's suns
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  • 10/03/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    The sunspot appearance reported last week seems to follow the pattern emerging for most of 2008. A spot will appear for one or two days and then suddenly it is gone. Last week's report mentioned the solar wind being at an all time low. This week, NASA ann
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