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  • 02/13/2009 | The K7RA Solar Update

    Sunspots returned this week, or rather, one did, but it is an old Solar Cycle 23 spot. Sunspot 1012 has been visible the last couple of days, February 11-12. It is down near the Sun's equator, typical for spots from a previous cycle. It's nice to have a s
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  • 02/06/2009 | The K7RA Solar Update

    We still have had no hint of sunspots or sunspots to come, though there was some geomagnetic activity on February 4 from a possible coronal mass ejection, raising the planetary A index to 16 that day. Sunspot numbers for January 29-February 4 were 0, 0, 0
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  • 12/26/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    Snow has fallen all week here in Seattle, and the Sun is still void of spots. We last saw sunspots on December 10, 11 and 12. The solar flux -- a measure of 2.8 GHz radio energy from our Sun -- has been running between 68-69 for weeks, except for December
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  • 12/19/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    Last week's sunspot group was only visible for three days, December 10-12. The average daily sunspot number for all of 2007 was 12.8; if we see no sunspots for the rest of 2008, the average for this year will be 4.7. By comparison, the yearly averages of
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  • 12/05/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    This was another quiet week; the geomagnetic indicators hovered around zero and there were no sunspots. Look at the A values for mid-latitude, high latitude and global here. There was another unusually quiet period this week on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday
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  • 11/26/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    This is an early bulletin for the Thanksgiving holiday, as ARRL is closed on Friday, the regular day for release of this bulletin. We plan another brief regular propagation bulletin on Monday, December 1 that will contain the propagation numbers for Novem
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  • 09/05/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    We're still looking at a quiet sun, but currently a solar wind is disturbing the Earth's magnetic field. Six meter operators -- after enjoying a fine season of sporadic E propagation this summer -- may see some added excitement from auroral propagation. C
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