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  • 12/26/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    Snow has fallen all week here in Seattle, and the Sun is still void of spots. We last saw sunspots on December 10, 11 and 12. The solar flux -- a measure of 2.8 GHz radio energy from our Sun -- has been running between 68-69 for weeks, except for December
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  • 09/26/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    This week saw the appearance of another sunspot -- a new Solar Cycle 24 spot -- larger and lasting a little longer than last week's Solar Cycle 23 sunspot. It appeared for two days, September 22 and 23, with sunspot numbers of 18 and 16.
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  • 09/19/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    Last week saw another brief sunspot appearance followed by a quick fade. This was an old Solar Cycle 23 spot -- number 1001 -- resulting in a sunspot number of 12 for September 11. Sunspot numbers for September 11-17 were 12, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 and 0 with a me
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  • 08/01/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    July ended with no sunspots at all -- save for three days, July 18-20, when one weak sunspot group appeared and faded from view. Sunspot numbers for those days were 11, 12 and 11. Sunspot numbers for July 24-30 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 and 0 with a mean of 0
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  • 07/25/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    For several days over the past week, we saw a couple of sunspots -- but just like other recent dying Solar Cycle 23 spots, they faded quickly. This group, lasting from July 18-20, was number 1000. No sign of Solar Cycle 24 in recent memory, just a couple
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  • 06/20/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    We are lucky to see sunspot activity this week, although it is only one. Sunspot 999 is currently in its most geo-effective position -- near the center of the Sun -- as we see it. This is another old Solar Cycle 23 spot. The sunspot number for the last fe
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  • 03/28/2008 | The K7RA Solar Update

    It is exciting to see heightened solar activity one week into spring. Currently, three sunspots are visible: 987, 988 and 989. The consensus says that all seem to be old Solar Cycle 23 spots. But with the three sunspot groups so close to the Sun's equator
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