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Two New Books Available from ARRL

05/24/2010

Just as many vendors release new products at the Dayton Hamvention, the ARRL will debut much-anticipated publications. This year was no exception. Two new books -- Remote Operating for Amateur Radio and the third edition of The ARRL RFI Book -- were introduced.

Remote Operating for Amateur Radio shows amateurs how to assemble their own Internet-controlled station. As many hams are discovering, it has become increasingly difficult to enjoy Amateur Radio at home. Some have been driven off the air altogether by antenna restrictions, local interference and other limiting factors. But the widespread availability of high-speed Internet offers a powerful solution: Amateurs can now setup a complete station at a remote location and operate via the Internet, just as though they are actually sitting in front of the radio. That radio could be just across town or 2000 miles away.

This book will guide you through the process of establishing your own Internet-controlled station. You’ll learn the basics of how the Internet works, how home networks operate and how to interconnect Amateur Radio hardware and software for remote Internet control. You’ll find station diagrams, software tips and much more. This book also addresses the legal aspects of remote station control, as well as the unique issues of remote operating as it applies to activities such as DXing and contesting. With more than 100 pages of solid, practical advice, Remote Operating for Amateur Radio is your guide to getting back on the air with the station of your dreams -- even if you live in an apartment!

Author Steve Ford, WB8IMY, points out that a growing number of amateurs are discovering that it has become extremely difficult, if not impossible, to set up home stations. Some home owner associations are banning ham antennas of any sort. Whole communities are attempting to pass ordinances restricting Amateur Radio antennas (the ARRL is opposing these efforts). And to make matters worse, neighborhoods are awash with consumer electronic devices that generate inference and seem overly susceptible to our signals.

If you’re finding it difficult to enjoy ham radio because of restrictions where you live, Remote Operating for Amateur Radio is your guide to freedom. In this book you’ll learn how to set up a remote station and operate it just as though you were sitting in front of the radio. You’ll also become acquainted with the FCC rules that govern remote operating, as well as the rules that impact your pursuit of contests and awards. No matter what your living circumstances may be, the full enjoyment of Amateur Radio is still as close as your nearest Internet connection.

ARRL’s team of highly trained experts has compiled the best advice available on every type of radio frequency interference (RFI) in this brand new edition of The ARRL RFI Book. From automotive to television, from computers to DVD players, from audio equipment to telephones, amateurs will find a step-by-step process for eliminating problematic interference in one convenient book. The third edition of The ARRL RFI Book also includes resources for addressing new realities of digital cable TV and satellite systems, over-the-air TV signals and troubleshooting, as well as hybrid and all-electric automobiles.

Despite our best efforts to rid the airwaves of RFI over the past nine decades, it is something Amateur Radio operators deal with over and over again. The best defense against this ongoing battle is to draw on the experiences of RFI experts who know the best way to tackle these problems. In the making of this book, the ARRL asked experts with various types of RFI to provide insights and solutions to the types of problems that they know best. These experts, both amateur and professional, have clearly and concisely provided their expertise.

Both Remote Operating for Amateur Radio ($22.95) and third edition of The ARRL RFI Book ($29.95) are available from the ARRL. Click here to read the first few pages of Remote Operating for Amateur Radio.



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