ARRL

ARRL General Bulletin ARLB025 (1995)

SB QST @ ARL $ARLB025
ARLB025 Amateurs get 219 MHz
 
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ARRL Bulletin 25  ARLB025
>From ARRL Headquarters
Newington CT  March 17, 1995
To all radio amateurs 
 
SB QST ARL ARLB025
ARLB025 Amateurs get 219 MHz
 
The FCC has released a Report and Order in ET Docket No.  93-40,
allocating the 219 to 220 MHz band on a secondary basis to the
Amateur Service for point-to-point fixed digital message forwarding
systems.  The allocation had been requested by the ARRL as partial
compensation for the loss of the 220 to 222 MHz band.
 
When the new rules take effect, on a date that has not yet been
announced, Technician and higher class amateur licensees will be
permitted to use digital emissions of up to 100 kHz bandwidth and no
more than 50 watts PEP output.  The primary occupant of the band is
the Automated Maritime Telecommunications Systems (AMTS).  To
protect the primary occupant, the ARRL has been designated as the
national contact point for all amateur operations in the 219 to 220
MHz band and is responsible for maintaining a database of all
amateur operations in the band.  All amateur stations must notify
the ARRL at least 30 days prior to initiation of operations in the
219 to 220 MHz band.  Amateur stations within 50 miles of an AMTS
coast station must obtain the written approval of the AMTS licensee
prior to operating.  Amateur stations within 398 miles of an AMTS
coast station must notify the AMTS licensee in writing at least 30
days prior to initiation of operations.  The ARRL will assist
amateurs in fulfilling these requirements.  Amateur stations
operating in the 219 to 220 MHz band are not permitted to interfere
with, nor are they protected from interference by, primary service
operations in and adjacent to the band.
 
The FCC action climaxes almost six years of effort by the ARRL.  For
additional background see May 1993 QST, page 9.  Full details will
appear in May 1995 QST.
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