ARRL

BPL in Great Britain

BPL Measurements in Great Britain (Radio Society of Great Britian) (RSGB)

RSGB Home Page - http://www.rsgb.org/
RSGB EMC Committee Page Internet: http://www.rsgb.org/society/emcc.htm
RSGB EMC Committee Information Pages Internet: http://www.qsl.net/rsgb_emc/

Notes on the Final Report of the RA's TWG on the Compatibility of DSL and PLT with Radio Services 1.6 to 30MHz Compiled by the RSGB for the benefit of Radio Amateurs
Internet: http://www.qsl.net/rsgb_emc/Notes%20on%20Fin%20Rpt%20Ver%201.pdf
Summary: This Radio Society of Great Britain summary of the work of the British government's RadioCommunications Agency Technical Working Group on DSL and PLC the WG's position on PLC, the extent of the interference problems reported and expected with PLC and lists a number of papers that have been produced by companies and organizations that support this conclusion.
Author: RSGB

The DSLPLC WG Final Report - UK Technical Working Group (TWG) on Compatibility Between Radio Services and VDSL + PLT Systems Operating between 1.6 and 30 MHz
Internet: http://www.radio.gov.uk/topics/interference/documents/dslplt.htm
Summary: This summary report of the British Radiocommunications Agency (RA) TWG concludes, "Field tests were undertaken by Agency officials to determine the possible levels of emissions from VDSL and PLT access systems respectively. The scope of this practical work was, by agreement, necessarily limited due to constraints on time and available facilities. It is accepted therefore that the significance of the results is correspondingly limited insofar as neither the VDSL or PLT access test arrangement was truly representative of likely practical commercial deployments. Nevertheless, sufficient data was gathered which enabled TWG to conclude that there is a finite possibility of interference to radio systems when operated within a few metres of cables or wires associated with VDSL or PLT systems. The propagation characteristics of the HF bands are unique in that it is possible, under certain conditions, to provide extended communications over exceptionally long distances, several thousand kilometres being a reasonable expectation under ideal conditions. This means that the bands are particularly valuable for international broadcasting; military applications; long distance maritime and aeronautical communication & navigation, and as a challenging recreational pursuit for amateur radio enthusiasts looking to develop techniques to establish contact over increasingly long distances taking account of prevailing conditions. But such extended propagation is variable, depending very much on seasonal conditions and natural changes in the ionosphere. This means that planning HF systems requires quite different techniques and assumptions to those used in higher order bands, where the limit of expected service area can be predicted with a high level of confidence." This committee report does not represent the official position of the British government.
Author: UK Technical Working Group

RSGB EMC PLT Position Paper
Internet: http://www.qsl.net/rsgb_emc/emcplc.pdf
Summary: The Radio Society of Great Britain raises a very robust objection to the current commercial proposals for PLT in the High Frequency spectrum with the currently suggested radiation levels. The Society will take all measures open to it to oppose the introduction of such mains HF signalling. The Society supports the introduction of broadband technologies provided they do not exceed a level allowing radio and telecommunications apparatus to operate as intended. The Radio Society of Great Britain recommends that all proposals for standards that would allow PLT to operate in the High Frequency spectrum be firmly rejected unless the signal levels are within the existing standards for mains conducted emissions or unless a specific frequency allocation is made for PLT that is compatible with radio services in the HF band.
Author: RSGB

PLT Test Information Including Sound Bites
Internet: http://www.qsl.net/rsgb_emc/PLTREP.pdf
Summary: This report summarizes field tests of PLC made by the Radio Society of Great Britain. As already reported elsewhere, it is difficult or almost impossible to capture and present the emissions from new broadband-communication systems using spread-spectrum-technologies at low or unknown data-rates (stand-by) by simple use of a spectrum analyser. Nevertheless even at these very low data rates, the harmful effect of these emissions on radio systems all over the spectrum used for radio communication is at once evident, as soon as emissions exceed the conventional limits.
Author: RSGB

Notes on RSGB Observations of HF Ambient Noise Floor
Internet: http://www.qsl.net/rsgb_emc/RSGBMeasurements_1b.pdf
Summary: A summary of the RSGB HF ambient noise measurements.
Author: RSGB

Background Noise on HF Bands
Internet: http://www.qsl.net/rsgb_emc/emcslides.html
Summary: Slide presentation on PLC made an an RSGB Amateur Radio convention.
Author: RSGB, Robin Page-Jones (G3JWI)

Notes on the RSGB Investigation of PLT Systems in Crieff
Internet: http://www.qsl.net/rsgb_emc/CRIEFF%20Notes%20Version_1.html
Summary: A summary of the RSGB field measurements made of the Crieff field trials. The report noted interference, but felt that more study was needed to quantify it more precisely.
Author: RSGB, Robin Page-Jones (G3JWI)

PLT and the Future of the HF Spectrum - from RadCom Feb. 2003
Internet: http://www.qsl.net/rsgb_emc/RadCom02PLT.pdf
Summary: Op Ed
Author: RSGB