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The ARRL Contest Update
February 3, 2021
Editor: Brian Moran, N9ADG
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IN THIS ISSUE
NEW HF OPERATORS -- THINGS TO DO

During the February 6-7 weekend, QSO parties include Vermont, Minnesota, and British Columbia. Participation in these also qualify for the State QSO Party Challenge. For the digitally minded, there's the Mexico International RTTY Contest. New this year is the 36-hour contest period. On Saturday evening in the US, the North American Sprint will provide 4 hours of fast-paced fun. If you're a first-time sprinter, make sure you read the rules and understand the flow of the contest, because it's much different than other contest formats. For DX opportunities, try the EU-DX contest. See their announcement of a distributed multi-multi category in the News section of this newsletter.

During the weekdays of February 8-12, look for participants in the ARRL School Club Roundup on phone and CW.

The weekend of February 13, the CQ WPX RTTY Contest will be the big deal on the air. New this year is a "distributed multi-multi" category. Don't forget the Thursday evening (US time) NCCC RTTY Sprints to make sure your RTTY configuration is in order. The normally-in-person Orlando Hamcation is the weekend of February 13, and all sessions are available online. There are multiple tracks to suit varied interests, including a Contesting track.

CONTEST SUMMARY

4 Feb - 17 Feb 2021

Complete information for all contests follows the Conversation section

February 4

February 5

February 6

February 7

February 8

February 9

February 10

February 11

February 12

February 13

February 14

February 15

February 16

February 17

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NEWS, PRESS RELEASES, AND GENERAL INTEREST

Really Ugly Sprint Message Graphic"The CW (February 6) and RTTY North American Sprint (March 13) will begin ONE HOUR EARLIER at 2300 UTC instead of 0000 UTC! The contests are still 4 hours long, so they will end at 0259 UTC. This change recognizes that 20 meters has been closing at the start of the winter contests. Moving the start earlier by one hour will give contesters in the north and east a much bigger window for 20 meter activity, making the contest more fun for everybody. The new start times in February and March are an experiment and will be evaluated after the contests to see if we want to continue with it. Also note: The September contest start times will not change. The log submission deadline is still 7 days from the end of the contest. All logs must be submitted via the uploader app and everyone is encouraged to post their claimed score at 3830scores.com.

Results for the CW Sprint will be published on an accelerated schedule with preliminary line scores available approximately 2 weeks after the contest and the full online results published about one month after the preliminary scores. A condensed version of the full results will then be published in the magazine version of NCJ.

The NCJ-sponsored North American Sprint web page with all results, rules, team registration, and other information is at ncjweb.com/north-american-sprint. A new how-to article by N3BB is available as well - look under "Tips" at the lower right of the Sprint web page. 73, Ward N0AX -- NA CW Sprint Manager"

Scott, K0MD, writes: "The last hour of the Minnesota QSO Party and the first hour of the NA CW Sprint will overlap this year. We are asking all Minnesota stations to give out a Sprint friendly exchange the last hour, which will be name, three-letter county abbreviation (required by Mn QSP), and a sequential number for the Sprint participants. We hope we can work one another in high numbers!" Minnesota stations in the QSO Party will be calling "CQ MNQP," which indicates to the Sprint participants that these stations are in Minnesota.

Ward, N0AX, chimed in (yes, it's true, my email alert is set to a chime): "The members-only First-Class Operators (FOC) contest also overlaps with the MnQP and Sprint. In case anybody gets confused about who is calling which contest."

The Amplitude Modulation (AM) mode may seem outdated to most on the ham bands, but the sponsors of the AM Rally on February 6 through February 8 celebrate the traditional and acknowledge and embrace new technology with a variety of entry classes, including one for SDR radios. AM transmitting has certainly gone high-tech in the past few years with the adoption of class E amplifiers and class H modulators. Transformer iron has been traded for silicon. The AM Classic also provides for award certificates for interesting situations such as "most clip leads," and "highest weight to power."

There's also the AWA Amplitude Modulation QSO Party on the weekend of February 13. Sponsored by the Antique Wireless Association, the contest scoring favors the use of lower power by assigning more points per contact.

Chris, N6WM, reminds that the CQ WPX RTTY Contest is just around the corner on February 13-14, and that there have been some rule changes including the addition of a new operating category: Multi-Transmitter Distributed. "We have a new entry category, and we think it will be interesting and exciting. It is called Multi-Transmitter Distributed. First a disclaimer for the hardcore Multi-multi gang, fret not, this new category is a separate one. Originally conceived to accommodate pandemic restrictions, this implementation if felt to be something that may stick beyond that. With a maximum of five transmitted signals, one per band, and keeping these groups within the same DXCC entity and Zone, it opens new possibilities of fun, team contesting as well as use of stations that otherwise may not be on for the contest. It encourages new strategies as far as communication and planning. Of course, all the traditional categories remain. If this is something that may interest you and some of your friends, check it out!"

For those using N1MM Logger+ that want to try the new category, it will pay to read the N1MM Logger+ document entitled "Multi-Computer and Multi-Op Contesting" especially section 4.2 "Distributed Multi-Ops".

The N1MM Logger+ team announced in early December, 2020, that Microsoft Windows XP would no longer be supported as of February 1. On January 18, Andy, KU7T reiterated that as of February 1, Windows XP would no longer be supported. An experimental version of N1MM Logger+ was made available on January 29, breaking Windows XP compatibility. By the time you read this, the first weekly build of N1MM Logger+ containing more modern libraries, and removing support for Windows XP, will be mainstream.

"Due to the world coronavirus situation, the EUDX Contest Committee has decided to consider, for this first edition, the Multi Multi category as Multi-Transmitter Distributed category. Stations operating in this category may have a maximum of six transmitted signals, one per band at any one time, from stations in different locations (each station = one person). All equipment, including remotely controlled equipment, must be located:

  • in the same Region for the European Union Countries (see Rules, Point 7);
  • in the same DXCC entity and same ITU Zone for non-European Union Countries.

Six bands may be activated simultaneously. Please visit https://eudxcc.altervista.org/eu-dx-contest/ for more information."

WORD TO THE WISE

Efflorescence

According to Wikipedia, Efflorescence is the "migration of a salt to the surface of a porous material, where it forms a coating." "Primary efflorescence" in concrete is a normal for concrete subject to moist conditions. When concrete absorbs external salt-laden liquids (such as where salt is used for ice melting), it can start to degrade, with the liquid re-appearing on the surface as "secondary efflorescence." For poured concrete structures (such as tower bases), extensive "secondary efflorescence" may indicate "internal structural weakness" brought on by the "migration or degradation of component materials."

SIGHTS AND SOUNDS

WB7IR was active during Winter Field Day last weekend. K7IR, WA7IR, K7XH, and K7EDX found a low-noise location on a hill in eastern Washington and made nearly 600 contacts during the event. [John, WA7IR, photo]

The 2021 Propagation Summit sessions are already available on YouTube.

Dave, KE0OG, recently assembled a QCX-Mini transceiver from QRP labs. He's created a video on how he adjusted toroids in the output circtuit to achieve a full 5 watts output. Perhaps he'll be using it in one of the many QCX Monthly QSO parties.

Dave, WO2X, put together a YouTube presentation on using Node-RED for ham radio. It "covers getting started with Node-RED and shows how to load new nodes, flows and customization of the dashboard."

Where's KC4USV? You might be able to spot it in one of the webcam images from McMurdo Station, Antarctica.

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RESULTS AND RECORDS

Contest sponsors - make sure you're sending announcements of contests and contest results to contest-update@arrl.org!

OPERATING TIP

State QSO Parties

QSO parties are popular events appealing to a wide spectrum of amateurs, from the most casual operators to those out to "win it all" in their category. There are state QSO parties for nearly every state, with California's CQP proclaiming itself the largest. In addition to, or sometimes instead of their own state-specific events, some states team up for a regional event: the New England QSO Party covers Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and the 7QP covers the traditional geographic area of the seventh call area. Some state QSO parties don't even call themselves the state QSO party: Washington's Salmon Run is a state QSO party in all but the name.

For most QSO parties, stations inside the state give out a signal report and county. Stations outside the state supply signal report, and their state. QSO party rules specify what is and is not a multiplier, and there may be special "bonus" stations, and special multiplier stations. Make sure both you and your logging program are up to date with the current QSO party rules if you're at all serious about this.

Participants that are beyond casual usually have the list of the state's counties printed out, because counties will be logged using abbreviations. For those that don't live here in Washington, it's a common mistake to mix-up WAH and WHA for WAHKIAKUM and WHATCOM counties. Having a county list at hand makes it much easier.

CQing: The call district number in a US call sign doesn't mean the station is actually located in that area, so there's a general "protocol" for calling CQ that's different for in-state versus out-of-state stations. In-state stations calling CQ in a QSO party usually use a message including the event, like "CQ Vermont QSO Party" (CW: "CQ VQP"), while out-of-state stations in a QSO party use a directed message including the state, e.g. "CQ Vermont" (CQ: "CQ VT"). A specific QSO party's rules may have specific suggestions for CQing.

For those that enter multiple QSO parties over the year, there's the State QSO Party Challenge in which "each call sign's cumulative score is calculated by totaling up his/her number of reported contacts and multiplying by the number of State QSO Parties (SQP) entered year-to-date. The use of the number of SQPs entered as a multiplier is to encourage radio amateurs to enter more state/province QSO parties."

TECHNICAL TOPICS AND INFORMATION

Tucked away on page 17 of the January/February 2021 issue of QEX is an article entitled "Using Plastics for Dielectrics" by Bob, W7SX. Bob provides an overview of the information provided by Dr. David Knight, G3YNH, on his website. If there's one thing that stands out, it's that PVC, fiberglass (GRP), and wood have poor Q characteristics (high loss tangents) at our RF frequencies. Bob suggests that PVC is not a good material to use for coil forms if low loss is a goal.

"The wrapping IS the speaker," "Tear and Hear," "It's the roll paper that talks to you!" - if the researchers at the Chemnitz University of Technology need some marketing help for their "lightweight roll-to-roll printed loudspeaker paper" I'm sure we can all help. Seriously though, the researchers took the fabrication of their piezo and polymer single-sheet speakers, and have adopted it to roll paper production. They envision all manner of applications for the lightweight and unconventional sound transducers.

Looking for a better way to hold up my tree-supported 80-meter dipole in Pacific Northwest winter storms, I came across these "stainless steel rope clips" from KF7P. Using a thimble and a compression clamp to hold the rope, it looks like it might extend the life of my braided rope ends.

Inexpensive power breakout boards are available to match inexpensive server power supplies mentioned a few issues ago. These boards are designed to power crypto-currency mining "rigs", and support a wide range of power supplies up to 1600 watts. The breakout board shown here was available with 2-day delivery from Amazon, and has 12 PCI-E power connectors, power supply on/off, and a voltmeter feature, for under $20. Those PCI-E connectors could be unsoldered, and replaced with Anderson Powerpole-type connectors. Don't forget fusing, since these supplies are capable of many 10s of amperes of current.

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CONVERSATION

Catching Up Remotely With Lee, WW2DX, Part 2

This is the conclusion of an interview I had with Lee, WW2DX, one of the founders of Remote Ham Radio. The first part was published in the January 20, 2021 issue of the Contest Update. In the first part of the interview, topics included the RHR footprint, the youth program, live streaming, future plans, and DXpeditions.

Brian, N9ADG: Is RHR facing competition for land in good radio locations? I've heard of a few people considering property in Maine.

Lee, WW2DX: I grew up in the state of Maine. I was licensed at 12, and have fond memories my early radio years in Maine. I didn't know until coming south how awesome propagation is from there. When RHR started and we were just getting our feet wet with locations in the Catskills, I realized that we really need to go to Maine. My mom still lives in Maine. I have a camp up there, which is how it all started in Maine. We found the place in Eastport and that was the beginning. When it comes to Maine and building a station there, A: it's a long way away. And B: the weather can be brutal. If you're willing to travel and you're willing to deal with the maintenance, have at it. It is absolutely work to maintain and keep those stations up there running. But it's awesome operating from there.

Brian, N9ADG: Where do you want to be in five years with RHR? Five years ago, would you have known you were going to be here?

Lee, WW2DX: It's still exciting, we're still pushing things forward. There's still so much to do and to experiment with and to test. I'm not sure if that'll ever stop. Five years from now? We're moving more towards providing experiences. There will be more outside the US.

Brian, N9ADG: RHR as "work" hasn't diminished your interest or your passion for radio -- you seem super energized!

Lee, WW2DX: I remember being a kid in Maine, 12 or 13 years old in '87 and I remember I couldn't wait until the weekends when school was out. I had a Drake TR4 and I couldn't wait to turn it on the first thing in the morning, because you couldn't find a clear frequency on 10 meters. It was so awesome. I remember spending my days working the world with a wire in a tree in Maine. I remember thinking, "what if I could figure out a way to make a living doing this?" Fast forward 30 years... I still have that passion, and being able to help others have that same passion is awesome. My interest in the hobby has even gotten stronger. I enjoy the DXpeditions and the technology pieces -- they're right in my wheelhouse. COVID is a bummer for everybody, but we'll get through it, and before you know it we'll be traveling again and going to weird places and setting up antennas and getting strange looks from people!

When I was younger I looked up to ON4UN -- I always thought he a real beacon, a true operator. He was always doing the right thing on the air, operating with a high standard. I thought as hams, we should all be that way. It's called amateur, but there are very professional operators out there. It's great to see people make things happen. That's what drives us here -- we just enjoy making it happen.

That's all for this time. Remember to send contesting related stories, book reviews, tips, techniques, press releases, errata, schematics, club information, pictures, stories, blog links, and predictions to contest-update@arrl.org

73, Brian N9ADG

CONTESTS

4 Feb - 17 Feb 2021

An expanded, downloadable version of QST's Contest Corral is available as a PDF. Check the sponsors' website for information on operating time restrictions and other instructions.

HF CONTESTS

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Feb 4, 0300z to Feb 4, 0400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No./"CWA", non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: February 6.

RTTYOPS Weeksprint, Feb 4, 1700z to Feb 4, 1900z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20m; [other station's call] + [your call] + [serial no.] + [your name]; Logs due: February 9.

NRAU 10m Activity Contest, Feb 4, 1800z to Feb 4, 1900z (cw) and, Feb 4, 1900z to Feb 4, 2000z (ssb) and, Feb 4, 2000z to Feb 4, 2100z (fm) and, Feb 4, 2100z to Feb 4, 2200z (dig); CW, SSB, FM, Digital; Bands: 10m Only; RS(T) + 6-character grid square; Logs due: February 18.

SKCC Sprint Europe, Feb 4, 2000z to Feb 4, 2200z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m; RST + (state/province/country) + Name + (SKCC No./"NONE"); Logs due: February 11.

NCCC RTTY Sprint, Feb 5, 0145z to Feb 5, 0215z; RTTY; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: February 7.

QRP Fox Hunt, Feb 5, 0200z to Feb 5, 0330z; CW; Bands: 20m Only; RST + (state/province/country) + name + power output; Logs due: February 11.

NCCC Sprint Ladder, Feb 5, 0230z to Feb 5, 0300z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m; Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: February 7.

K1USN Slow Speed Test, Feb 5, 2000z to Feb 5, 2100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20m; Maximum 20 wpm, Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: February 7.

Vermont QSO Party, Feb 6, 0000z to Feb 8, 0000z; All (see rules for FT8 guidance); Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, VHF/UHF; VT: RS(T) + County, non-VT W/VE: RS(T) + (state/province), DX: RS(T); Logs due: February 21.

10-10 Int. Winter Contest, SSB, Feb 6, 0001z to Feb 7, 2359z; Phone; Bands: 10m Only; 10-10 Member: Name + 10-10 number + (state/province/country), Non-Member: Name + 0 + (state/province/country); Logs due: February 16.

EurAsia HF Championship, Feb 6, 0800z to Feb 6, 1700z; CW, Phone; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RS(T) + 6-character grid square; Logs due: February 11.

F9AA Cup, CW, Feb 6, 1200z to Feb 7, 1200z; CW; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 2m; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: March 7.

Mexico RTTY International Contest, Feb 6, 1200z to Feb 7, 2359z; RTTY Only; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; XE: RST + State, non-XE: RST + Serial No.; Logs due: March 15.

FYBO Winter QRP Sprint, Feb 6, 1400z to Feb 7, 0000z; CW, SSB, Digital; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RS(T) + (state/province/country)+ name + power out + temperature(F); Logs due: March 8.

Minnesota QSO Party, Feb 6, 1400z to Feb 7, 0000z; CW (CW/RTTY/Digital - no FTn), Phone (FM/SSB); Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; MN: Name + County, W/VE: Name + (state/province), DX: Name; Logs due: February 20.

FISTS Saturday Sprint, Feb 6, 1600z to Feb 6, 1800z; CW; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; FISTS: RST + (state/province/country) + first name + FISTS No., non-FISTS: RST + (state/province/country) + first name + "0"; Logs due: February 20.

British Columbia QSO Party, Feb 6, 1600z to Feb 7, 0359z and, Feb 7, 1600z to Feb 7, 2359z; CW, SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; BC: RS(T) + District, non-BC: RS(T) + (state/province/"DX"); Logs due: February 22.

AGCW Straight Key Party, Feb 6, 1600z to Feb 6, 1900z; CW; Bands: (see rules) ; AGCW: RST + Serial No. + "/" + Class + "/" + Name + "/" + Age; Logs due: February 28.

European Union DX Contest, Feb 6, 1800z to Feb 7, 1800z; CW, SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; EU Union: RS(T) + EU Union Region (4-characters), Non-EU Union: RS(T) + ITU Zone No.; Logs due: February 14.

North American Sprint, CW, Feb 6, 2300z to Feb 7, 0300z; CW; Bands: 80, 40, 20m; [other station's call] + [your call] + [serial no.] + [your name] + [your state/province/country]; Logs due: February 14.

K1USN Slow Speed Test, Feb 8, 0000z to Feb 8, 0100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20m; Maximum 20 wpm, Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: February 14.

ARRL School Club Roundup, Feb 8, 1300z to Feb 12, 2359z; CW, Phone, RTTY/Digital; Bands: All, except 60, 30, 17, 12m; RS(T) + Class (I/C/S) + (state/province/country); Logs due: February 27.

OK1WC Memorial (MWC), Feb 8, 1630z to Feb 8, 1729z; CW; Bands: 80, 40m; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: February 12.

Worldwide Sideband Activity Contest, Feb 9, 0100z to Feb 9, 0159z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m; RS + age group (OM, YL, Youth YL or Youth); Logs due: February 10.

RTTYOPS Weeksprint, Feb 9, 1700z to Feb 9, 1900z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20m; [other station's call] + [your call] + [serial no.] + [your name]; Logs due: February 9.

NAQCC CW Sprint, Feb 10, 0130z to Feb 10, 0330z; CW; Bands: ; RST + (state/province/country) + (NAQCC No./power); Logs due: February 13.

QRP Fox Hunt, Feb 10, 0200z to Feb 10, 0330z; CW; Bands: 20m Only; RST + (state/province/country) + name + power output; Logs due: February 11.

Phone Weekly Test - Fray, Feb 10, 0230z to Feb 10, 0300z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15m; NA: Name + (state/province/country), non-NA: Name; Logs due: February 12.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Feb 10, 1300z to Feb 10, 1400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No./"CWA", non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: February 13.

VHF-UHF FT8 Activity Contest, Feb 10, 1700z to Feb 10, 2000z; FT8; Bands: ; 4-character grid square; Logs due: February 15.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Feb 10, 1900z to Feb 10, 2000z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No./"CWA", non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: February 13.

RSGB 80m Club Championship, Data, Feb 10, 2000z to Feb 10, 2130z; RTTY, PSK; Bands: 80m Only; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: February 11.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Feb 11, 0300z to Feb 11, 0400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No./"CWA", non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: February 13.

RTTYOPS Weeksprint, Feb 11, 1700z to Feb 11, 1900z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20m; [other station's call] + [your call] + [serial no.] + [your name]; Logs due: February 16.

NCCC RTTY Sprint, Feb 12, 0145z to Feb 12, 0215z; RTTY; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: February 14.

QRP Fox Hunt, Feb 12, 0200z to Feb 12, 0330z; CW; Bands: 20m Only; RST + (state/province/country) + name + power output; Logs due: February 18.

NCCC Sprint, Feb 12, 0230z to Feb 12, 0300z; CW; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: February 14.

K1USN Slow Speed Test, Feb 12, 2000z to Feb 12, 2100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20m; Maximum 20 wpm, Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: February 14.

CQ WW RTTY WPX Contest, Feb 13, 0000z to Feb 14, 2359z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: February 19.

SARL Field Day Contest, Feb 13, 1000z to Feb 14, 1000z; CW, SSB, Digital; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RS(T) + Number of transmitters + Category (see rules) + Province (or "DX"); Logs due: February 22.

Asia-Pacific Spring Sprint, CW, Feb 13, 1100z to Feb 13, 1300z; CW; Bands: 40, 20m; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: February 20.

Dutch PACC Contest, Feb 13, 1200z to Feb 14, 1200z; CW, SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; PA: RS(T) + province, non-PA: RS(T) + Serial No.; Logs due: March 1.

KCJ Topband Contest, Feb 13, 1200z to Feb 14, 2359z; CW; Bands: 160m Only; JA: RST + Prefecture/District Code, non-JA: RST + Continent Code (AF,AS,EU,NA,OC,SA); Logs due: February 28.

SKCC Weekend Sprintathon, Feb 13, 1200z to Feb 15, 0000z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m; RST + (state/province/country) + Name + (SKCC No./"NONE"); Logs due: February 21.

YLRL YL-OM Contest, Feb 13, 1400z to Feb 15, 0200z; CW/Digital, SSB; Bands: All; QSO No. + RS(T) + (section/province/country); Logs due: March 16.

HamCation QSO Party, Feb 13, 1500z to Feb 14, 0300z; CW, SSB; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; (state/province/country) + local expected high temperature (see rules); Logs due: February 19.

OMISS QSO Party, Feb 13, 1500z to Feb 14, 1500z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RS + (state/province/DX) + (OMISS No. if member); Logs due: March 1.

Feld Hell Sprint, Feb 13, 1900z to Feb 13, 2059z; Feld Hell; Bands: (see rules) ; (see rules); Logs due: February 17.

RSGB 1.8 MHz Contest, Feb 13, 1900z to Feb 13, 2300z; CW; Bands: 160m Only; UK: RST + Serial No. + District Code, non-UK: RST + Serial No.; Logs due: February 14.

AWA Amplitude Modulation QSO Party, Feb 13, 2300z to Feb 14, 2300z; AM; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20m; Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: March 14.

PODXS 070 Club Valentine Sprint, Feb 14, 0000z to Feb 14, 2359z; PSK31; Bands: 160, 80, 40m; Name + (OM/YL) + (state/province/country); Logs due: February 21.

Balkan HF Contest, Feb 14, 1300z to Feb 14, 1700z; CW, SSB; Bands: 80, 40m; RS(T) + QSO No.; Logs due: February 21.

K1USN Slow Speed Test, Feb 15, 0000z to Feb 15, 0100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20m; Maximum 20 wpm, Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: February 21.

4 States QRP Group Second Sunday Sprint, Feb 15, 0100z to Feb 15, 0300z; CW, SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: RS(T) + (State/Province/Country) + Member No., Non-member: RS(T) + (State/Province/Country) + Power; Logs due: February 17.

CQC Winter QSO Party, Feb 15, 0100z to Feb 15, 0259z; CW; Bands: 80, 40, 20m; RST + (state/province/country); Logs due: March 16.

OK1WC Memorial (MWC), Feb 15, 1630z to Feb 15, 1729z; CW; Bands: 80, 40m; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: February 19.

RSGB FT4 Contest Series, Feb 15, 2000z to Feb 15, 2130z; FT4; Bands: 80m Only; 4-character grid square; Logs due: February 16.

Worldwide Sideband Activity Contest, Feb 16, 0100z to Feb 16, 0159z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m; RS + age group (OM, YL, Youth YL or Youth); Logs due: February 17.

RTTYOPS Weeksprint, Feb 16, 1700z to Feb 16, 1900z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20m; [other station's call] + [your call] + [serial no.] + [your name]; Logs due: February 16.

QRP Fox Hunt, Feb 17, 0200z to Feb 17, 0330z; CW; Bands: 20m Only; RST + (state/province/country) + name + power output; Logs due: February 18.

Phone Weekly Test - Fray, Feb 17, 0230z to Feb 17, 0300z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15m; NA: Name + (state/province/country), non-NA: Name; Logs due: February 19.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Feb 17, 1300z to Feb 17, 1400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No./"CWA", non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: February 20.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Feb 17, 1900z to Feb 17, 2000z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No./"CWA", non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: February 20.

AGCW Semi-Automatic Key Evening, Feb 17, 1900z to Feb 17, 2030z; CW; Bands: 80m Only; RST + Serial No. + "/" + 2-digit year first used a bug; Logs due: March 12.

VHF+ CONTESTS

See SKCC Sprint Europe, NCCC Sprint Ladder, Vermont QSO Party, F9AA Cup, CW, Worldwide Sideband Activity Contest, above.

LOG DUE DATES

4 Feb - 17 Feb 2021

February 4, 2021

February 5, 2021

February 6, 2021

February 7, 2021

February 8, 2021

February 9, 2021

February 10, 2021

February 11, 2021

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ARRL Information

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

ARRL Contest Update wishes to acknowledge information from WA7BNM's Contest Calendar,

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