ARRL

Tube Transmitters/Receivers

Introduction

Many hams fondly remember their first homebrew transmitter--it is hard to forget the warm glow of a vacuum tube.  With the availability of New Old Stock (NOS), it is quite practical for hams to recreate that first radio!

Articles

  • A Novice T.R. Switch by Lew McCoy, W1ICP.  While this switch passes too much power for modern solid state rigs, this 6AH6 pentode switch is perfect for vintage tube stations.  You can substitute a 1N4004, 1N4005, 1N4006, or 1N4007 for the obsolete selenium rectifier, CR1.

  • DCS-500 Double-Conversion Superheterodyne Receiver 
    The Radio Amateur's Handbook, 1964, pp. 133-139
    This ham band 80 -10 five tube (6BA6, 6U8A), two transistor receiver includes a 100-kHz calibrator.
     
  • An Inexpensive 75-Watt Transmitter 
    The Radio Amateur's Handbook, 1964, pp. 172-175
    This crystal controlled transmitter for 80-, 40-, 20-, 15-, and 10-meters uses a 12BY7 and a 1625.
     
  • The "Novice Special" Transmitter 
    The Radio Amateur's Handbook, 1971, pp. 181-183
    This 15-watt, 80- and 40-meter cw transmitter was intended for the novice constructor. It uses a 6C4 and a 5763.
     
  • A 75- to 120-Watt CW Transmitter 
    The Radio Amateur's Handbook, 1971, pp. 184-187
    This transmitter uses a 6GK6 and the famous 6146B.
     
  • FT-101 Power Amplifier Valves from Ham Radio Today (RSGB) April 1998
    Beware of changing the 6JS6C power amplifier valves in the venerable old FT-101 (this applies to direct replacement without circuit modification)
     
  • Converting Surplus Transmitters for Novice Use 
    The Radio Amateur's Handbook, 1960, pp. 215-218
    Information on converting an ARC-5, BC-457 or similar surplus transmitter for amateur use.

 

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