ARRL

ARRL Sections - New Hampshire

New Hampshire

New Hampshire

Contact Information

Section Name:
New Hampshire
Contact:
Peter Stohrer, K1PJS
Email:
k1pjs@arrl.net

Basic Information

Division:
New England
Alert:

 

On July 25th, Governor Hassan signed HB 1360, legislation to limit certain electronic devices by the driver of an automobile in NH to deal with distracted driving.

 

In an effort  to prevent Amateur Radio  use from becoming prohibited  while driving, several Amateurs aided by Brookfield, NH Representative Bill Nelson, KA1PTW testified before the House committee for additional language that would exempt 2 way radios from the bill. Working with the Department of Safety,  verbaige was added to the legislation which states " use of one hand to transmit or receive messages on any non-cellular 2-way radio." would be allowed.

 

In other words, with the bill now law, mobile 2 way radio operation by a driver is not prohibited but still allowed in NH.

 

The final version of the bill to take effect in 2015 can be read at http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/legislation/2014/HB1360.html

 

Amateurs who provided written or verbal testimony during the House hearings;

 

Jim Philopena KB1NXE Marlborough, NH

Dave Colter WA1ZCN ASEC New London, NH

Pete Stohrer K1PJS SM Concord, NH

 

Description:

 

Now is the time to be thinking of an Amateur Radio License Class

Hams are giving people, you will find them providing communication resources to help in emergencies or support for public service events. Sometimes, you will find them conducting Amateur Radio classes and some even become Volunteer Examiners administering the tests as part of a VE team.

Without a doubt, it is fulfilling to help another toward the goal of passing an Amateur Radio exam and receiving a license. Each of us have been there; thankful for those that took the time to assist us.

 We know prior to taking the exam, the potential licensee will need to study and review the necessary material for the license sought after and having a class to attend with other like minded students for instruction is certainly well worth the time and investment not only for the student, but provides the instructor(s) opportunities to share his or her Amateur Radio knowledge and experience.  The FCC issues 3 classes of licenses today; the Technician, General and Extra which are administered by a 3 person Volunteer Examiner (VE) team.

The fall is a wonderful time for Amateur Radio clubs to prepare a class.  Cooler months often re-focus activities to the inside, which provide an ideal time to conduct Amateur Radio License sessions.

License classes are conducted numerous ways; from the single all day session to multi-class sessions, usually given over many weeks.  Clubs know their demographics best and often tailor a class to meet the needs of their particular area.

If you are wondering how to structure a typical Technician Class, consider a period of 6 Saturday mornings (or day and time of the club’s choice). This provides a good way for the instructor(s) to cover two easily digested chapters per session.   The ARRL study manual has 10 chapters covering the introduction to Amateur Radio, Basic Electronics, Antennas, Propagation, Amateur Radio equipment, Licensing and Operating regulations ending with a chapter on Safety. The final class would be a VE session conducted a by the local VE team.

 Recently, the FCC Technician question exam pool was updated and using the new ARRL Ham Radio License Manual, Third edition, June 30th 2014 – July 1, 2018 is now in effect. The main advantage of the multi-session class is to allow students time to absorb the material presented from each session and to bring questions for the instructor during the next. Recruiting several in the local club to share in the teaching responsibilities takes advantage of different gifts and experiences from each instructor and makes individual chapter preparation quite manageable.

Registering with the League as an instructor can provide substantial discounts on license manuals and other related instructional material with the Instructor Discount Program. Further info on the program can be found at http://www.arrl.org/License-instructor-registration

The League also provides a way to promote your Amateur Radio License Class on the arrl.org website. Once details are determined, go to URL http://www.arrl.org/list-a-license-class to list your class. Send the information also to peter@k1pjs.com to have it added to the Section  www.nharrl.org web site and the NH Section Facebook page.

Finally, If you are interested in becoming a Volunteer Examiner, information can be found at the League web site http://www.arrl.org/volunteer-

or drop me an email peter@k1pjs.com 

vy 73,

Pete K1PJS

NHSM

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This month Assistant Section Manager and EC from Coos County, KB1IZU, provides us with news and information from the North Country. 

A North Country Rhapsody 

by Robert R. Martin (KB1IZU), EC

As a wit once observed, “ya gotta have an exaggerated sense of humor to live in the North Country.” And it's true.  Life up here is like living in a suburb of Heaven, but you have to pay your dues for the privilege.  Life is not easy, but for those who like the ambiance, they would not give it up for the world.  Residents tolerate exaggerated amounts of snow, spring mud and the infamous May/June black flies for the natural beauty of the surroundings and relaxed lifestyles this part of the State offers.

Coös county is everyone's recreational area, to the degree that the resident population of 44,000 can swell two or threefold with transients during any particular season, be it: winter for snowmobiling / skiing, summer for ATVing, and/or Fall hunting/fishing.  And, of course, hiking, camping and complaining about politics and taxes goes on year-round.  Northern NH is a favorite retirement area for many, and the county boasts a surprising large percentage, per capita, of licensed amateur radio operators, as a result.

For the radio operator in our region it, offers outstanding opportunities or interesting challenges. Those fortunate enough to live on the hilltops and ridge-lines, its possible to put up effectively an eight hundred to thousand plus foot high antenna by stringing a wire in the trees in the open spaces out back.  For those living in the valleys, NVIS is a practical necessity, not an abstract concept. In either case, low ambient noise is the rule not the exception, unlike most major urban areas where competing uses of electronic devices produces a garbling background clatter that is hard to overcome.  And far reaching repeaters on mountain tops .. . now that is another story entirely . . .

The same terrain that makes Coös a great place to recreate also makes is wonderful location for public and service events, at which amateur radio gets a chance to participate and provide useful safety assistance.  Among these events, to name just a few, are the New England Forest Rally, Bike Race Around Mt. Washington, Wildman Biathlon up to Wildcat Mountain, Mt. Washington Auto Race, et al.  Cell phone covers is still far from universal so that local ARES repeaters throughout Coös are able to provide a link in the safety net for people out on the trails summer and winter.

Amateur radio operators in the North Country have formed an interconnected fraternity of people with common interests, who are more closely knit then in many other places.  Coös boasts two amateur radio associations, who meet regularly for social and hobby related purposes.  The LARK (Littleton Amateur Radio Club) draws it membership from the southwest corner of North Country region and up the Connecticut River valley as far as Pittsburg.  In a similar fashion, the Androscoggin River Valley Radio Club, based in Berlin, is the home to amateurs, who live and work on the east side of Coös from Errol down to Mt Washington.  The membership rosters of these two associations encompasses the majority of the active amateur radio operators in the North Country.  In addition, the region has an active ARES group that liaises with state the State EM center and provides local support for emergency services within the local dispatch centers and health/hospital coverage zones.  Both associations run a Field Day exercise every year.  One takes place down in Franconia and the other on the Commons in Gorham.  In a similar fashion, both clubs have an active recruiting program to bring new hams into the community and support Extra Class VE teams.  Test sessions given as required typically net up to four or five new hams or license upgrades each year.

Coös county and its immediate environs in north Grafton has fifteen of the 41 tallest mountains (4000 ft and above) in all of NH.  (The rest are located in the White Mountain National Forest just south of the county.) Having so much high terrain in the county is a mixed blessing.  The high points, if one can get to them, make ideal places to put a repeater for maximum coverage.  The other side of that coin is with so many high places, Coös also has a correspondingly large number of deep valleys into which it is difficult to direct a radio signal.  To counteract this problem, the county has a significant number of strategically located 2M repeaters; although, there is little activity on 220 and 440Mhz.  These repeaters have been placed tocover most of the distances along the Connecticut and Androscoggin rivers, plus serve the three major population centers in the Littleton/Lancaster,Berlin/Gorham and Colebrook/northern areas of the county.  Additionally, two principal repeaters serve a larger geographic area each – Mt. Washington and Cannon Mt. – but both suffer from the inability to reach down into the valleys as one moves farther away from them.  For instance, from hot spots north as far up and the Canadian border and south beyond Concord one can hear the Mt. Washington repeater and yet not be able to reach it from behind a mountain even five miles away.

The proximity of local repeaters, insures, that in most places, one is not completely out of touch by radio with the rest of the community when traveling.  One problem that still is not completely resolved is being able to depend upon VHF radio across and around mountain ranges and between population centers.  The Coös ARES is embarked upon a project to remedy this situation.  Three key istanceadio location have been identified and work is ongoing to establish a repeater directly linked to a node unit on Mt. Washington in each.  The Mt.Washington unit will act as a coordinating facility between the other three locations.  When activated later this year, a person in any one area will be able to communicate locally as well as talk to someone in either of the other two areas, notwithstanding any intervening high ground.  A significant improvement over the present situation.

From the above comments one may appreciate that the North Country is an amalgam of diverse locations, unusual micro-climates, resilient residents, and great opportunities live free and enjoy an interesting lifestyle.  For those of us who live up here, it is and always will be a “work in progress.”  Come visit us and see for yourself!

Other June News

June 2014 Amateur Radio Month in New Hampshire

The State of New Hampshire

By Her Excellency

Margaret Wood Hassan, Governor 

A Proclamation

AMATEUR RADIO MONTH

JUNE 2014

 Whereas, Amateur Radio represents an organized, volunteer communications public service asset, duly authorized by the Federal Communications Commission; and

 Whereas, Licensed Amateur Radio operators in New Hampshire using skills developed through practice and radio equipment built or purchased themselves, form a vital communications network under the auspices of the American Radio Relay League- New Hampshire Amateur Radio Emergency Service (NH –ARES) program; and

 Whereas, The New Hampshire Section of the American Radio Relay League (NH-ARRL) has a Memorandum of Understanding with New Hampshire’s Homeland Security and Emergency Management to provide situational reporting and other communication capabilities in times of disaster ; and

 Whereas, Licensed  New Hampshire Amateur Radio operators demonstrated their value in public assistance by providing free radio communications for local parades, bike-a-thons, walk-a-thons, fairs and other charitable public events; and

 Whereas, Amateur Radio once again proved its undisputed relevance in the modern world in 2013 by providing emergency communications when other systems failed in the aftermath of the Boston Marathon Bombing of 2013 and Hurricane Sandy; and

 Whereas, the ARRL is the leading organization for Amateur Radio in the USA; celebrating its centennial anniversary in 2014, and

 Whereas, the ARRL Amateur Radio Field Day exercise will take place on June 28-29, 2014 and is a 24 hour emergency preparedness exercise and demonstration of the Radio Amateurs’ skills and readiness to provide self supporting communications without further infrastructure being required; now

 Therefore, I Margaret Wood Hassan Governor of the State of New Hampshire, do hereby officially recognize and

designate June as Amateur Radio Month in the State of New Hampshire

 

Section News May 2014

Hard to believe Nearfest XV at the Deerfield Fairgrounds has come and gone! The weather for the spring session was superb and attendance at the event was good both days. Many thanks to Mr. Mike, W1RC and the Nearfest team for the volunteer time and effort they provide to the Amateur community for this great semi-annual event. This year the good folks at Nearfest have graciously agreed to support the ARRL Spectrum Defense fund by matching Amateur contributions up to a total of 1000 dollars. Several Amateur Radio Clubs have already taken advantage of this. To find out more and how you can participate contact John Moore, N1FOJ. John’s email is jcn1foj@aol.com

Several new members have come on board as part of the Section Field Organization (FO) team. Larry Beagle, KB1RIJ is the new Public Information Coordinator taking over for Martin Koechel, KW1M. Larry’s first task is working with the Governor’s office on the annual Proclamation for June as Amateur Radio month in NH. Each year the proclamation coincides with the month Field Day activities occur. Also joining the FO is Dee Hebert, AB1ST. Dee’s extensive technical and administrative background, along with the team of Technical Specialists throughout the Section, provides an excellent resource for Amateur Radio technical advice for all Amateurs in NH. Dee takes over for Tom Howey, K1TWH who has taken a position outside of NH. We thank Tom for his service to the Amateurs of NH and wish him well in his new endeavor.

Two Technician licensing classes have recently concluded around the Section. In Concord,the Contoocook Valley Radio Club held a class at the American Red Cross producing 5 new Technician operators. At the Belmont High School, as part of the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math program (STEM) teacher Dave McDonald, KB1QFX along with Central Club member and educator ASM Dick Christopher, N1LT presented the Technician license material followed by a VE session conducted by the CNHARC that resulted in 12 new High School students joining the Amateur ranks.

A reminder that the Technician Class License will have new a new question pool and new study guides at the end of June.

When you receive this newsletter Dayton will in full swing. If you happened to travel to the mega-fest we would like to know about it! Send any information and pictures to peter@k1pjs.com and we can add it to future newsletters and social media sites.

Speaking of social media, the NH ARRL Facebook page is a great resource of local Amateur Radio news and information. If you have been looking for a reason to get on Facebook this is a very good one. To create an account, simply go to www.facebook.com and follow the instructions to setup an account. Once done you can log onto the NH ARRL site at anytime and add your own information and pictures.

The Section would like to acknowledge the volunteer efforts of Cliff, N1RCQ. Cliff was recently recognized by Breathe Inc. as the April volunteer of the month for his part in the Breathe New Hampshire’s Annual Seacoast Bike Tour. Congratulations Cliff!

HB1360 was introduce dto the NH House in January. The bill is designed to limit the use of cellphone use in a vehicle by the operator. Section had concerns that two way radio mobile operation could be impacted by this bill, similar to what has happened in other states. Thanks to the testimony of several Amateurs and with help from the Department of Safety, language was added to the legislation to exempt any non cellular two way radio. In other words mobile, two way radio communication by the vehicle operator would still be allowed should the bill become law. The bill has past the House and Senate and it is believed the Governor will sign he bill into law.

To read a complete copy of the amended bill go to; http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/legislation/2014/HB1360_SA.html

One of the foundation pillars of the ARRL is traffic handling and there has been a marked increase in traffic being passed in NH during recent months. All Amateurs should be familiar with the basics of formal traffic handling as your communication services may be called for during incidents that bring the power grid and internet down for extended lengths of time. NH has several traffic nets. The Section CW net is the VTNH traffic net which meets daily at 7p on 3539 khz. On phone you can find traffic being past nightly on the Granite State Traffic Net on 146.94 in Concord and Saturday mornings on the  NH Digital Net on 3582khz at 7:30a and the NH ARES Traffic and Training net on 3945 at 8:30a. Many of the NH ARES groups routinely pass traffic during their weekly net sessions. If you are interested in a CW traffic handler and net training course, the Maryland Slow Net is always looking for new operators. Simply QNI (check in) on one of their nightly nets at beginning at7:30p. You can find the MSN on 3563khz . For further information on Traffic Handling contact the Section Traffic Manager, Joe Burke, W1INC at w1inc@arrl.net

The NH Slow Net (CW) on 3539 khz has QNO for the season and will resume in the fall. Thanks to the many stations that QNI over the winter months. Look forward to seeing you in the fall.

In August, the Section is hosting a conference on Traffic Handling and the Official Observer program. Basics of traffic handling for both CW andvoice will be presented and information on the official Observer program will be discussed. Stay tuned for further details on the NH ARRL web site and social media pages.

Many thanks to Bob Raymond, WA1Z, and the plethora of operators who put NH into the earphones of Amateurs around the world as part of the April W1AW/1 QSO Centennial party.Nearly 50,000 QSOs were logged during the third and fourth week in April!W1AW/NH will be back our way in the fall. Keep an eye out for it in QST or the League web site www.arrl.org

In a sense, the Centennial celebration of the ARRL has already begun with the year long Centennial QSO party but the nexus of the celebration is scheduled for July 17-19 in Hartford.Guest speakers, flea markets, League tours in Newington among other events are scheduled during the 3rd week in July. All of this follows on the heels of the WRTC 2014 activities going on a week before. Check out QST or the League website for details on both events.

Looking for volunteers and operators for the McAuliffe / Shepard Discovery Center Amateur Radio station, KA1SKY.  Amateur Radio volunteers operate the station and share with those stopping by the many facets of Amateur Radio. The annual ARRL “Kids day” is coming up June 21 and this would be a great time to introduce those under 18 to the wonders of Amateur radio at KA1SKY. If interested please drop me an email peter@k1pjs.com to learn the details of becoming a volunteer.

If you have news and information that can be shared with the NH Amateur radio community, please send to k1pjs@arrl.net

73

K1PJS

NH SM

 

  ______________________________________________________

                               

 

February 2014


The American Radio Relay League celebrates its 100th birthday in 2014. Back in 1914 Hartford, Connecticut resident and automobile entrepreneur Hiram Percy Maxim along with teenager Clarence Tuska, began what would become the nation’s foremost organization for Amateur Radio. December 2013 QST (page 69) details the beginning of the League and the unconventional meeting of both Maxim and Tuska. The idea of a radio relay to bring cohesion to a growing number of radio operators not only would foster the ability of message handling but create a unifying force to lobby the government for the RF spectrum rights of Amateurs.

The ARRL has a plethora of activities to celebrate the Centennial from a year-long Centennial QSO party to the main event in the Hartford area in July 2014. Between Thursday July 17 and Saturday July 19 thousands will gather at the Connecticut Convention Center in Hartford will be the nexus for League sponsored seminars, exhibits and flea markets. Daily tours of the Maxim memorial station, W1AW and League Headquarters will  be available during the 3 day event.

January signals the start of the year-long Centennial QSO party which has two main on-going operating activities. W1AW takes to the road and will operate portable in each of the 50 states. NH hosts the flagship station on 2 dates; April 23 – 29 and September 10 – 19. Further details will be made available on the  www.nharrl.org  web site when W1AW portable take to the air in NH.  The Centennial point challenge provides participants the ability to earn points by contacting other League members with increasing points for League officials up to a one time value of 300 points for contacting the ARRL President, Kay Craigie, N3KN. For a complete details of the rules and points check for the Centennial QSO party check  out…… http://www.arrl.org/centennial-qso-party The Centennial QSO Party is not a contest but awards will be issued. Earn awards based upon points, working all states or working W1AW portable in every state and territory. This is an on-the-air event like no other.

2014  looks to be an exciting year in Amateur Radio. Stay tuned for information updates from W1AW and QST.


This month we are pleased to present  from the NH Section Leadership team, Loren Albright, W1UV,  Official Observer Coordinator,  to share a few words on the Official Observer program.


The Official Observer Program is function of The Amateur Auxiliary (AA). The AA is an FCC field organization created by an agreement between the FCC and the ARRL. Members of the Official Observer Program monitor the amateur frequencies for FCC rule violations, band intrusions, and for interference issues. The program has about 700 Official Observers (OO's) throughout the U.S. There 8 in NH.

OO's do not enforce the rules. OO's are not "Band Cops". OO's only monitor for rule violations and notify the offenders only by mailed Advisories. OO's also listen for good operation and can complement amateurs with "Good Operator Reports". The most common rule violations are out-of-band operation, splattering, and band intrusions. Many FCC rules are subjective in nature so good judgment is required when deciding to send an advisory. OO's also assist with interference issues. The overall goal of the OO program is to help Amateur Radio operators by letting them know of rule violations before the FCC takes action.

The OO program within a Section is managed by the Section Manager and his appointed Official Observer Coordinator (OOC). The OOC collects monthly reports from the OO's in his Section and forwards them to the SM and the League, answers any questions the OO's may have, sets guidelines for OO duties, forwards to the league issues that need to be elevated to the FCC, and reviews applicants for an OO position. OO's may not contact the FCC directly. Only the League is permitted to do that.

Because the OO program is part of the face of Amateur Radio, OO applicants are vetted as thoroughly as possible. Many are rejected because they misunderstand the purpose of the OO program and have tendencies towards being Band Cops. The most important quality of an OO is good judgment and good communications skills.

 The application process is:

·        Apply on-line at the ARRL web site. The application is forwarded to the SM and OOC.

Not everyone is cut out for the job and more applicants are turned away than accepted. However, if you feel you have the qualifications and want to help Amateur Radio, please apply. I am especially interested in having OO's in the Northern and Western part of NH. I am also looking for applicants with CW skills. You must have a General Class license or above and been one or least 2 years.


73

Loren Albright - W1UV

Official Observer Coordinator - NH Section

 

 

For monthly NET statisitcs go to

http://www.nharrl.org/nh-nts.html

 

 

 

                           

December 2013

Section, Local and Regional Nets


Section
Net           Sessions   QNI        QTC          QTR          NM     Freq        Time
VTNH              22          78            38             219                         3539        Dy 7p
GSTN               31         115           77             317        K1PJS    146.94     Dy 9p
NH ARES         4            49            4                91        KB1YAI   3945      Sa 8:30a
NE NBEMS      5           28            12             200       KB1OKX 3582      Sa 7:30a
NHSN              10           50            2              150         K1PJS       3539    m-w-f 7:30p    
  
Local           
CADN                3             9             5                73          W1RLL      146.94      We 8p
CA ARES            3           18            1                81          W1RLL     146.895    Mo 7p

Region
1RN                  62          220        179             556        W1KX        3598       1930 & 2130L


Station Activity Reports

SAR          ORG       REC       SEN      DEL      Total         BPL
K1PJS                         46          52          6            104
W1INC                      40           22          5             67  
AB1AV         1           32           48           3             84
WA1MXT  

K1NN                   

Public Service Honor Roll

PSHR              1             2            3            4             5             6         Total
K1PJS            40          40        30                                         30         140
W1INC         29           40          30           5                            20         124    
WA1MXT     40           40          30                                                       110
AB1AV           40          40          10                                                         90               

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December 2013

Welcome to the NH Section ARRL page. 

For further information please log on to NH Section web site  or NH Section Facebook page.

NH ARES     

Section News and information

NH NTS   

Over the next few months you will hear from various departments within the Field Organization to provide you information and updates on particular happenings and news. This month we are pleased to have Assistant Section Manager, Dennis, N1IMW, share a few words on “CW Operations and Training” and activities within.


Thanks for stopping by!  As 2013 winds down, we are looking forward to 2014 as a growth year for code operations here in our ARRL NH section.  Operating code gives both new and existing hams a great mode to work low power (QRP), field operations, contesting, kit building, NTS traffic operations, DX worldwide contacts and just plain old ragchewing with fellow code operators.

Our goal for the NH section in 2014 is to help 15 operators achieve 10 words per minute proficiency via the 10-wpm endorsement for W1AW.  Saturday morning classes will be held starting in January to assist members who would enjoy the camaraderie of a group setting for practicing and learning code.  Stay tuned for details on location and exact time that should be announced by mid-December.  I look forward to hearing from all New Hampshire hams regarding your possible interest in the classes.  The more the merrier!  Email me at:  n1imw@aol.com.

In the meantime, look for the second issue of the SLOW CODE SNAIL MAIL- our section newsletter with updates, tips and assorted information you’ll enjoy reading about (sign up at my email address above both email and US postal mail is available).  Also, check out the ARRL website (www.arrl.org) for helpful information about cw operations.  More importantly, find the W1AW (the league station in Newington, CT) code practice schedule and LISTEN.  LISTEN, too, for the NH CW Slow Net held M-W-F at 7:30 PM in the code portion of 80 meters, usually at 3539 kHz.  LISTEN !  Two words you’ll be hearing from me over and over:  Listen and Practice!  Listen and Practice . . .Listen and Practice! Let’s work at our goal of 15 new CW ops here in the great State of New Hampshire.

Dennis, N1imw

N1imw@aol.com

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October 2013 

 

Section, Local and Regional Nets

Section
Net           Sessions   QNI   QTC   QTR       NM        Freq        Time
VTNH             24            94    41       253                    3539        Dy 7p
GSTN             31          148    81       350   K1PJS    146.94    Dy 9p*
NH ARES        3              27     3          68   KB1YAI    3945      Sa 8:30a

NHSN              4              19                 67   K1PJS     3539  m-w-f 7:30p

* GSTN on 146.94 in Concord PL114.8
  
Local
CADN            5             17       7         172        W1RLL 146.94     We 8p
CA ARES      3             31       3          107        W1RLL 146.895   Mo 7p

Region
1RN              62          244   224        686         W1KX      3598    1945 & 2130L
   
Station Activity Reports

Station      Org      Rec     Sen      Del      Total         BPL
K1PJS                      67        51         1         119
  

WA1MXT    23         46        64         9         142   

 W1INC                     38        16                      54      

K1NN                        16        18         8           42

AB1AV                      31        51                      82       

Public Service Honor Roll

PSHR              1            2         3         4        5         6          Total

 

K1PJS           40          40      30                            30            140

WA1MXT       40          40      30                                            110 

W1INC           31          40       30      40                20            161       

 AB1AV          40          40       10                                             90

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November  2103

Fall is upon us. Days are noticeably shorter and there is the refreshing crisp “feel” of things to come as we head out of the house inthe morning. Many of us are hurrying to finish up those delayed antenna projects or maybe out on an afternoon hike with the portable QRP rig taking in the ebb of summer. As the calendar turns to October, with anticipation we look forward to Nearfest on the 11th and 12th, one of the last outdoor ham radio events before snowflies. With the cooler weather and eventual snow comes more time in the shack and settling into regular winter time operating activities. 

I heard the other day on the local repeater of a ham getting his 160 meter dipole up in the air to take advantage of the quieter “Top Band”during the colder months. It reminded me of a number of years ago being presented with the opportunity from the local broadcast station, that signed off at midnight,  to take possession of the radio stations 350’  vertical. Several AM’ers carried a truck load of equipment into the transmitter shack before the appointed time and after the station signed off loaded up the tower on 160 making contacts up and down the east coast and having the best of time operating into the wee hours.

Seeking camaraderie with fellow hams during the cooler months is never a problem as many head off to the monthly meeting at the local radio club. NH is blessed to have a dozen or so clubs with excellent programs throughout the year but attendance usually increases after September as many return from summer vacations and non-amateur activities during the longer hours of daylight.

If you are thinking of joining a local club and need help finding one you can log onto the NH ARRL web site www.nharrl.org on the right hand side of the home page is a listing of NH Amateur Radio Clubs. Find the nearest one and pay a visit.

 Don’t forget to periodically log onto the ARRL national website, www.arrl.org to get up to the minute news on important amateur radio events, contests, W1AW operating schedule and a plethora of information for the novice all the way up to the seasoned operator.

Just around the corner and certainly something to mark onthe calendar, is the Centennial of the ARRL. In July 2014, consider participating at the ARRL National Centennial Convention going on at the Connecticut Convention Center in Hartford. Amateurs from all over the world will be attending and we in NH are fortunate to be within an easy morning drive. Stay tuned to W1AW and QST for upcoming news and information about the Centennial. Tours of the League and W1AW will be among many of the activities. 

73,

Pete

NH SM

September NTS  2013

Section, Local and Regional Nets

Section
Net           Sessions   QTC   QNI   QTR       NM        Freq        Time
VTNH             23            79      44     251                     3539        Dy 7p
GSTN             30            81    148    350     K1PJS    146.94    Dy 9p*
NH ARES       4               2       37      92      KB1YAI    3945      Sa 8:30a

__________________

* GSTN on 146.94 in Concord PL114.8
  
Local
CADN            4               5       16     113        W1RLL 146.94     We 8p
CA ARES      3               1        25     350       W1RLL 146.895   Mo 7p

Region
1RN              60          190     226   582      W1KX      3598    1945 & 2130L
   
Station Activity Reports

Station      Sent       Rec      Del       Org      Total         BPL
K1PJS          57        83          2                      140
                                    

WA1MXT      81        68          7          23        179

W1INC         15        36                                     51

AB1AV         16        34                                     50

Public Service Honor Roll

PSHR              1            2         3         4        5         6          Total

K1PJS           40          40      30       20                30            160

WA1MXT       40          40      30                                           110  

W1INC          27          40       30       60                 20           177

AB1AV          28          40       10                                             78

=======================================================

 To: All NH Amateurs

From: Peter Stohrer, K1PJS - Section Manager

September 2013

The events of January 28th, 1986 are written into most of our memories. 73 seconds after launch, the Space Shuttle Challenger exploded claiming the lives of all 7 astronauts, among them Christa McAuliffe of Concord. Christa was the first educator selected for the Teacher in Space in Program developed by NASA to inspire students, honor teachers and to spur interest in mathematics, science and space exploration. Following the accident, President Reagan appointed a special commission to investigate the cause which found failure of the O rings on the Solid Rocket Booster the main contributor to the disaster.

In memory of Christa and to perpetuate her legacy, a state of the art science center and planetarium opened in Concord in 1989 and named the Christa McAuliffe Planetarium. A later addition in 2009 to honor another NH astronaut and 1st American in space, Alan B Shepard Jr, was dedicated and renamed the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center.

As part of the educational curriculum at the Discovery Center, Amateur Radio was introduced initially as a working display and later developed into a fully functioning Amateur Radio station with call letters KA1SKY to reflect the Discovery Center’s logo that “the Sky is not the limit.” The original station included a Kenwood TS-2000 transceiver and power supply, a 40’ Rohn tower with high gain VHF and UHF yagi antennas installed with the help of the Port City Amateur Radio Club. In addition to terrestrial contacts, the station was designed for scheduled communications during the Space Shuttle program and later with the International Space Station. In 2011 the station was dedicated in memoriam to Gregory J. Mumley, KA1FJ (SK) and Kenneth S. Rust, KB1PRV (SK) and given the name the Mumley-Rust Memorial Amateur Radio Station.

The station operating position has recently experienced a complete makeover to better enable the volunteer to share with Discovery Center visitors the many facets of Amateur Radio with an emphasis on wireless technology and space communication. Early in the summer of 2013, a new 5 band, 3 element directional antenna was added to the station inventory, providing new opportunities for the KA1SKY signal to reach more distant parts of the globe.  Computer applications tracking amateur satellites, CW and digital decoders and software to control the amateur transceivers provide multiple tools for the operator. A convenient internet connection allows real time logging using the N3JP 3.0 software. The station is also equipped for digital communication through the TS-2000 using an external Rig Blaster Pro interface and FLDIGI application for PSK31 or many of the other digital modes available.

The recent makeover of the station has provided a more comfortable operating position for volunteers and greater visibility for the public. Operators have a choice of operating either the Kenwood TS-2000 or newly donated Icom IC-7600. The station is capable of operation in most modes using CW, voice and digital. Each year in June, the KA1SKY operators take part in the Discovery Center event known as “Aerospace fest” to recognize New Hampshire’s Alan Shepard who became the first American in space. During Aerospace fest the station takes on the special call of K1A.

The Contoocook Valley Radio Club (CVRC) oversees the development, maintenance and staffing of the station, along with volunteers from numerous radio clubs in NH that routinely operate and provide radio instruction to the visitors of the Discovery Center. Several CVRC members have donated equipment to complement the existing installation which provides an enhanced operating and further educational possibilities.

Volunteers are being sought to introduce and educate the public to the wonders of Amateur Radio. Interested applicants are vetted in the same way as regular Discovery Center volunteers, through a two-step process including a regular application followed by a background check. After the application process, a meeting with the Discovery Center staff is conducted and once approved the applicant goes through brief training on the equipment and an overview of the station goals.

KA1SKY would not be possible except for the many generous donations from individuals and organizations. The New England Amateur Radio Festival, Inc. a prime supporter from the beginning has provided financial resources necessary for the initial development and ongoing equipment upgrades. Other individual donors providing equipment include Saga Broadcasting Inc., WF1F, KK1KW and WW1WW.

The volunteers who donate their time and knowledge bring various qualities and experience to the station and there is still plenty of room at the operating table for you. KA1SKY continues the mission of Christa and the goals of the Teacher in Space program by generating interest in mathematics and science through the discipline of radio. Please consider becoming a volunteer and share your love of Amateur Radio in such a unique way. If you would like further information on volunteering at KA1SKY send me an email k1pjs@arrl.net

 

73,

 

Pete

K1PJS, SM for NH

 

 

==========================================================

 

 NH NTS Statistics

 

August 2013

Section, Local and Regional Nets

Section
Net           Sessions   QTC   QNI   QTR       NM        Freq        Time
VTNH             27            45    111     45                       3539        Dy 7p
GSTN             31          109    181   348      K1PJS    146.94    Dy 9p*
NH ARES       4               2       37      92      KB1YAI    3945       Sa 8:30a

* GSTN on 146.94 in Concord PL114.8
  
Local
CADN            4               5       16     108        W1RLL 146.94     We 8p
CA ARES      3                         22       99        W1RLL 146.895   Mo 7p

Region
1RN              62          179     240   590      W1KX      3598    1945 & 2130L
   
Station Activity Reports

Station      Sent       Rec      Del       Org      Total         BPL
K1PJS          33         52          2                        87

AB1AV          39         21                                     60

WA1MXT      40         35         6          10           91

W1INC         12         30                                     42                 

K1NN            9            7         4               1        21   (QNI VTNH QTH VT)


Public Service Honor Roll

PSHR              1            2         3         4        5         6          Total

K1PJS           40          40      30       35                 20           165

WA1MXT       40          40      30                                             110  

AB1AV           40          40      10                                               90 

W1INC          26          40      30       10                 20           126

 


   

         ===========================================

June 2013

Section and Local nets

Section
Net       Sessions     QTC           QNI       QTR       NM           Freq      Time
VTNH                                                                          WA1MXT 3539    Dy 7p
GSTN          30             53             179        370        K1PJS   .94         Dy 9p
NH ARES    4               1                37         79          N4COY  3945    Sa 8:30a
NE NBEMS 3               20              11          145       KB1OKX 3582   Sa 7:30a 

 
Local
CADN         4               12              17               122        W1RLL146.94     We 8p
CA ARES   4                 1               28                98        W1RL   146.895    Mo 7p

Region

1RN           60              182          255              537       W1KX    3598 1945 & 2130 Dy

Station Activity Reports

S
AR          Sent       Rec        Del       Org      Total         BPL
K1PJS        18          28            7          1         54
W1INC       8           11            2          0           21
AB1AV       22         19            0          0           41
WA1MXT   32         68            18       20         138


Public Service Honor Roll

PSHR              1             2            3            4             5             6         Total
K1PJS            40           40         20          7             0             20        127  
W1INC            19           21         20          5             5            10         80
AB1AV            32           40         10          0             0             0           82
WA1MXT        40           40         30          0             0             0          110

N1CKM          13           6            10         60           0              0          89

 

 

July 2013
Section, Local and Regional Nets


Section
Net           Sessions   QTC   QNI   QTR       NM        Freq        Time
VTNH           31           35        80      215                      3539        Dy 7p
GSTN            31         101     180     400    K1PJS    146.94    Dy 9p
NH ARES       4            4         38       82    N4COY    3945       Sa 8:30a
NE NBEMS                                                 KB1OKX   3582       Sa 7:30a

* GSTN on 146.94 in Concord PL114.8
  
Local
CADN           4              6        17      120   W1RLL 146.94     We 8p
CA ARES      4             1        30       111   W1RLL 146.895   Mo 7p

Region
1RN                                                            W1KX  3598 1930 & 2130L

Station Activity Reports

SAR          Sent       Rec      Del       Org      Total         BPL
K1PJS        59           83        7            0         149
W1INC       12           31                                    43
AB1AV        24           13         1                         38 
WA1MXT  125         103       15         43         286 
N1ZIH          5               1         1                          7

Public Service Honor Roll

PSHR              1            2         3         4        5         6          Total
K1PJS             40         40       30                            20         130
W1INC            40         40       30       10                20          127
AB1AV             34          38      10                                            82      
WA1MXT         40          40      30                                          110
N1ZIH             15            5       10       50                                80        

         ===========================================

June 2013

Section and Local nets

Section
Net       Sessions     QTC           QNI       QTR       NM           Freq      Time
VTNH                                                                          WA1MXT 3539    Dy 7p
GSTN          30             53             179        370        K1PJS   .94         Dy 9p
NH ARES    4               1                37         79          N4COY  3945    Sa 8:30a
NE NBEMS 3               20              11          145       KB1OKX 3582   Sa 7:30a 

 
Local
CADN         4               12              17               122        W1RLL146.94     We 8p
CA ARES   4                 1               28                98        W1RL   146.895    Mo 7p

Region

1RN           60              182          255              537       W1KX    3598 1945 & 2130 Dy

Station Activity Reports

S
AR          Sent       Rec        Del       Org      Total         BPL
K1PJS        18          28            7          1         54
W1INC       8           11            2          0           21
AB1AV       22         19            0          0           41
WA1MXT   32         68            18       20         138


Public Service Honor Roll

PSHR              1             2            3            4             5             6         Total
K1PJS            40           40         20          7             0             20        127  
W1INC            19           21         20          5             5            10         80
AB1AV            32           40         10          0             0             0           82
WA1MXT        40           40         30          0             0             0          110

N1CKM          13           6            10         60           0              0          89

 

__________________________________________________________

 

For WIDEST Dissemination  6/23/11 

  I am pleased to announce the appointment of Martin Koechel, K9AMG as the New Hampshire Section Public information Coordinator (PIC) replacing Peter Stohrer K1PJS.  Last year, Peter graciously accepted the position of EC for the Capital Area group in addition to his already assigned PIC duties.  Martin had been recognized as a potential candidate for the PIC position having shown great proficiency while serving as the Public Information Officer for the Granite State Amateur Radio Association.  Peter worked with Martin over the past year to further hone his skills.   

Peter will continue in his role as EC of CARES. Peter had been  successful in creating the NH-PIC page at www.nharrl-pio.org, developing a Face Book page, and working with the governor’s office to secure the past two Amateur Radio Proclamations. Peter who is in the broadcast industry, worked with the producers of the award winning New Hampshire’s Chronicle TV program (Channel 9) showcasing Field Day at CVRC in 2010.  

Martin has been licensed since 2009, holds a general class license and is working on his Extra. He is a member of the GSARA, CVRC and active in Skywarn.  Martin also holds the position of Secretary at the GSARA.    Martin is employed by Cadence Design Systems working as a Sr. Marketing Manager in the Strategic and Process Group developing electronic automation software.  His wife Tara, KB1ULI and their son Kevin, KB1UVM are both active hams.  Daughter Shannon, although not licensed yet, enjoys CW especially at Field Day.

In accepting the position, Martin said “I am looking forward to working with our NH clubs and ARES groups, to promote Amateur Radio in the Granite State by continuing to build on the foundation that Peter has established.  If anyone is interested in becoming a Public Information Officer for their organization, please feel to contact me: mkoechel@gmail.com, 603.714.5490 (cell), 603.206.0138 (home).”   I welcome Martin to the New Hampshire Section senior staff and look forward to working with him on public information opportunities.   73,   Al Shuman, K1AKS
Section Manager &
Section Emergency Coordinator New Hampshire Section ARRL - The national association for Amateur Radio ™ 603-487-2727  (H) 603-657-1092 (W) 603-487-3333  (C) k1aks@arrl.org

 

 *******

June 6, 2011

Joint Conference Announcement and Call for Papers

  Microwave Update 2011 & The 37th Eastern VHF/UHF Conference. Both sponsored by the North East Weak Signal Group at   Holiday Inn 1 Bright Meadow Blvd, Enfield, CT, 06082 USA   October 13 - 15, 2011   This year the premier amateur radio microwave conference and the Eastern VHF/UHF conference will include tours, hospitality, swap session, equipment for measuring and tweaking, banquet and of course technical presentations.   Please visit http://www.microwaveupdate.org/    for the latest updates, registration and hotel information. Contact Paul Wade W1GHZ w1ghz@arrl.org by July 15, 2011 for paper and talk arrangements. Papers must be submitted by August 30.

-----

 February 24, 2011

Subject: A Very Real Threat to the 440 Amateur Radio Band

Attention New Hampshire ARRL Members and other interested hams:

The following is an important message from Dan Henderson, N1ND,
Regulatory Information Manager at ARRL Headquarters:

"As you may have read, Rep. Peter King (R-NY) has introduced
the'Broadband for First Responders Act of 2011' and the bill has been
assigned HR 607 as its number.  The full story about the Bill's
introduction can be found on the ARRL web at
http://www.arrl.org/news/spectrum-management-bill-threatens-amateur-frequencies


As you will read, while the ARRL supports spectrum for the Public
Safety needs, we oppose HR 607 in its current form because of the
inclusion of the 420-440 MHz spectrum (&a

New Hampshire Officials