ARRL

WA9WVX

Joined: Sat, Apr 4th 1998, 00:00 Roles: N/A Moderates: N/A

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HF Beam Antenna Polarization Aug 19th 2014, 02:05 6 362 on 21/8/14

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Icom IC-71 6M rig schematic? W1VT 3 days, 1 hour ago
According to the Radio Reference webpage: ICOM Manufactured the IC-71 Between 1968 and 1971 in Japan (was not available for export) and there's no information on the Manual or Schematics. Here's what the 6 m transceiver looks like: http://www.rigpix.com/icom/ic71.htm I even chacked on mods.dk website and It doesn't exist, one of Japan's most guarded secrets. Zach, I remembered that ICOM built a 2 m version, the IC-21A FM Only transceiver and perhaps you could find a Manual and a Schematic on this transceiver to do a comparison on the microphone wiring connections.

Dan
WA9WVX
Elmer needed - Galeton, PA area KB3MOW 1 week ago
Hi Dave,

I found a few hams in the Galeton, PA but here's the guy I would recommend ADRIAAN A ARBEIDER, KB3GCQ of GALETON, PA. Adriaan has his EXTRA Class License so he would know what your friend needs to learn to become an Amateur Radio Operator and where the local EXAMS administrated. Perhaps Adriaan can point your friend towards a local Amateur Radio Club which normally has a wealth of knowledge for the Amateur Radio Community and your friend will be able to meet people who enjoy this hobby. I suggest that your friend to give Adriaan a call on the telephone before heading over to his home. If your friend cannot find Adriaan's telephone number, I'm supplying his address so your friend can stop by and inquire about ham radio. The address is 64 ALPINE LANE
GALETON, PA 16922.

Good Luck

Dan
WA9WVX
Yaesu's new digital hand held WA3FKG 1 week, 4 days ago
Great ... repeaters that die within 3 months, Yaesu's engineering team sure didn't do the homework on that design. Also seems strange that the repeater owners haven't tried to slip in a Henry continuous duty power amplifier to evaluate the system using that method. I wasn't aware that the Astro & Fusion aren't compatible but it may come down to using Motorola's technology and possible lawsuits involved over patent rights. It would also be interesting to test a pair of Fusion units using a Quantar repeater to see if the digital signals would pass on through. About the only thing that might stop the digital signaling would be the digital PL signaling codes (not DPL) as they are different. I remember reading on BatLabs where there was a company that could modify a MSF5000 to pass the Astro digital signaling. They were doing it for the State of Wisconsin maybe 8 or 10 years ago but I never heard what they found out by doing this modification.

Interesting that here in the U.S. our FCC determined to information the U.S. manufactures to design around a format that prevented more than one digital signal from passing through RF / IF stages to the receiver's audio stage and this holds true for digital TV reception too. If more than one signal is detected, nothing gets through to video or audio stages and if you happen to be near high power tension lines, they generate noise, the human ear using Analog can pick out the recovered audio whereas when you're using Digital the receiver is unable to differentiate whether the signal is digital or noise and stops anything from passing through to the audio stage.

Whereas in Europe, they devised a method to pass multiple signals through the receivers so the human could attempt to decipher the information. There's always some kind of a trade off when going from Analog to Digital especially when dealing with multipath as the 1s and 0s begin to flip too many times even with forward correcting digits and eventually the audio signal is garbled beyond use. On the other hand, when switching between Analog and Digital, the Analog signaling starts to develop picket fencing and eventually drops out, switching to Digital the recovered signal is 100% and it's been determined that using a higher gain antenna on a mobile will cause multipath conditions whereas using a 1/4 wave is much better. This even holds true for base station applications, less gain equals out to less multipath and the umbrella effect. I believe Digital is our future although many in the Amateur Radio community are fighting it tooth and nail much like when the hams started switching between AM to SSB, it took a little time but eventually 98% of the ham population use SSB on HF.

As far as the CDMA format, it runs circles around FDMA, TDMA and MFSK (D-Star) as it has the ability to detect signals further down into the noise, much like PSK-31 versus JT-65. All of these Digital technologies have been around for 50~60 years as I have a copy of the IEEE Radio Handbook and they are all described in that refertence book.

Dan
WA9WVX
Yaesu's new digital hand held WA3FKG 1 week, 4 days ago
I think you people should remember when YAESU was bought out by Motorola. Well Motorola developed the Astro P25 Digital Mode and their repeaters were Quantars which could be set up in a Transparent mode so signals being detected as Analog FM would repeat as Analog FM or if the detected signal was Astro Digital, it would repeat as Astro Digital. When the people of YAESU broke away from Motorola with the Amateur Radio Products and returned to Japan, their engineers just duplicated the Motorola format for Fusion. Actually all Motorola wanted was the Yaesu and the Standard Commercial Land Mobile Radio Product line, they didn't care about the Amateur Radio Products as it was just something they got in the business deal. Fusion is nothing more than the FDMA Digital format. I'm waiting for some company to develop a multi-digital mode format that can do D-Star, Astro / Fusion, MotoTrbo and CDMA, I think it's just a matter software and time to develop such a transceiver.

Dan
WA9WVX
Yaesu VX-8DR TX restriction outside 430-450 KK6OXU 2 weeks, 1 day ago
Just because your BoaFeng handhelds can cover a wider frequency bandwidth, this doesn't mean that you are allowed to operator outside the Amateur Radio VHF or UHF Bands. From 400 MHz up to 420 MHz is strictly used by the U.S. Federal Government. I wouldn't want to be caught using those frequencies unless you don't mind having any three letter agency visit your home, take all of your ham radio equipment, arrest you, make you show up in Federal Court, heavily fine you and send you to work in Leavenworth, Kansas breaking rocks into pebbles. The place is a Federal Penitentiary. BTW, Stupidity is not a viable reason for your actions in any Court of Law.

Using frequencies above 450 MHz with out the proper Business Band License can put you in the same situation as using frequencies below 420 MHz, the Federal Communications Commission licenses all of the different RF channels and they don't have a Good Sense of Humor when you or other individuals are caught using the unauthorized frequencies.

The 420 through 450 MHz Amateur Radio Band is shared with the U.S. Air Force and they are the Primary user, the Amateur Radio Community are secondary users and it's been that way for decades. Their is a FCC Mandate that limits the ham radio operators on the UHF Band to 50 W output Maximum because of the Air Force's PAVE PAWS Radar System.

As far as modifying your YAESU handheld to cover the 420 to 430 MHz would be against the ARRL & the FCC Rules & Regulations. If you really need to know why YAESU didn't allow the first 10 MHz of our UHF Band, I would recommend to contact the manufacture directly.

As for your learning to operate and answer any of your questions about this hobby, I'm suggesting to join a very good Amateur Radio Club in Riverside, CA and here's their website http://www.w6tj.org/ it's only 15 or 16 miles from Corona, CA.

Dan
WA9WVX

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