ARRL

September 2010

September 2010

Vol 8, No 9
September 2010
IN THIS EDITION:

  • It’s a Birthday
  • Audio PSAs for your 75th
  • Writing to a local TV station? Get an interview!
  • Press Release
  • Having a Party
  • National Preparedness Month
  • Start NOW on Leonard Award Action
  • Going Public
  • The Last Word - copycat

It’s a Birthday!

The Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES®) will be celebrating its 75th anniversary from September through December 2010. This program of the ARRL – the national association for Amateur Radio – has provided “ham radio” emergency communications for agencies such as the American Red Cross, Salvation Army, countless Emergency Operations Centers and others in the worst of times. In events from ice storms to Hurricane Katrina, when normal communications systems were down or overloaded, the Amateur Radio operators of the ARES programs responded to requests for communications aid.

Over the years the equipment has changed, but the decentralized communications nets that ARES can create to blanket regions without the need for other infrastructure remain critical in emergency planning. Recognition of this capability has led to renewed formal agreements with DHS, FEMA, NOAA and other federal agencies. With over 20,000 of the country’s 680,000+ Amateur Radio operators involved in ARES -all of them truly “amateur” and providing their time, services, knowledge and equipment totally uncompensated- I believe they are more than worthy of recognition for their 75 years of community services in the worst of times.

You can find more information about ARES at: http://www.arrl.org/public-service

Information about the anniversary is at: http://www.arrl.org/ares-anniversary

Thanks Pete!

Pete Summers, KL2GY, has voiced two audio PSAs for the 75th. One is 30 seconds and one is 60. Either one can be downloaded and taken to local radio stations.

60 sec PSA for 75th ARES

30 sec PSA for ARES 75

ARES 75th Logo

Writing to a local TV station? Get an interview!

Dear Mr. TV Producer:

I ask your consideration of a segment for The ________ Show. I have several excellent, sharp, literate people who could provide for a most interesting interview on Amateur Radio and why are we still so important. Guess what! Ham Radio is not dying after all, and it is a lot of fun! In fact, it is growing in the US with over 680,000 Amateur Radio operators. There were 30,000 new FCC licenses in ’09 and 2010 is already setting records for new hams.

Despite billions of dollars spent by government agencies, the volunteer hams of ARES® are still the ones they call on in the first 48 hours of a major crisis. They provide communications, information and technical skills when other systems are down or overloaded. Not bad for “amateurs!”

The Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) will be celebrating its 75th anniversary from September through December 2010. This program of the ARRL – the national association for Amateur Radio – has provided “ham radio” emergency communications for agencies such as the American Red Cross, Salvation Army, countless Emergency Operations Centers and others in the worst of times. In events from ice storms to Hurricane Katrina and Haiti, when normal communications systems were down or overloaded, the Amateur Radio operators of the ARES programs responded to requests for communications aid. Over the years the equipment has changed, but the decentralized communications nets that ARES can create to blanket regions without the need for other infrastructure remain critical in emergency planning. Recognition of this capability has led to renewed formal agreements with DHS, FEMA, NOAA and other federal agencies. When the Internet, cell phone and electricity go out – they call on us, the hams.

You can find more information about ARES at:

www.arrl.org/ARES-anniversary

www.arrl.org/amateur-radio-emergency-communication

www.arrl.org/public-service

or by simply calling me at _____________

Thank you for your consideration and I look forward to your reply. ----------Signature & more contact info-----------

Press Release

Date__________

Local radio hams celebrate 75 years of volunteer emergency service

The Amateur Radio Emergency Service® (ARES) is celebrating its 75th anniversary from September through December 2010. This program of the ARRL – the national association for Amateur Radio – has provided “ham radio” emergency communications for agencies such as the American Red Cross, Salvation Army, countless Emergency Operations Centers and other responders in the worst of times. Their specially trained radio communications volunteers give thousands of hours of community services for free.

In the ___________________ area, the _____________________________has been providing this community service for many years.

The fastest way to turn an emergency into a disaster is to lose communications. In events from ice storms to Hurricane Katrina and Haiti, when normal communications systems were down or overloaded, the Amateur Radio operators of the ARES programs filled requests for communications aid. Over the years the program name and equipment has changed but the vision remains. The modern communications nets that ARES quickly creates to blanket whole regions - without the need for other infrastructure - remain critical in emergency planning. In the first hours and days of a major event, Amateur Radio is often the source of initial information on the type, scope and reactions needed to save lives.

Recognition of this capability led to formal agreements with DHS, FEMA, NOAA and other federal, state and local agencies. When the Internet, cell phone and electricity go out – they call on the hams. The first mention of an organized Amateur Radio emergency response organization appears in the September 1935 issue of QST Magazine. Some of the major responses needing ARES Amateur Radio operators for emergency communications in recent years include these well-known events:

Earthquake in Haiti – 2010
Hurricane Ike in Texas - 2008
Earthquake in Hawaii—2006
Flooding in Northeastern States—2006
Hurricanes Katrina, Wilma and Rita—2005
Wildfires in Texas, Oklahoma and New Mexico—2005
Hurricanes Charley, Frances, Ivan and Jeanne—2004
Tsunami in Asia—2004
Earthquake in Central California—2003
Hurricane Isabel—2003
Northeast Blackout—2003
Shuttle Columbia Recovery Effort—2003
Wildfires in Colorado—2002
Flooding in Kentucky—2002
World Trade Center, Pentagon and Western Pennsylvania Terrorist Attacks—2001
Tropical Storm Allison—2001
Fires in Los Alamos, New Mexico—2000


Like other modern wireless technologies, Amateur Radio has come a long way from its beginnings. With more people involved than ever before in the US, today’s amateurs are expanding their voice and digital networks, using satellites and TV, developing hybrid applications of radio-internet and GPS location systems, long-range Wi-Fi types of systems and more. Hams are the consummate “DO-ers” not just “USE-ers” of technology.

To learn more about ARES and Amateur Radio, go to http://www.arrl.org/2011-arrl-national-convention-2ares-anniversary .

###

Local Contact Info: _____________

Graphic/Logo available at: http://www.arrl.org/2011-arrl-national-convention-2ares-anniversary

Listen to KQ6FM

Download

Audio from Now Hear This with more information about the coming anniversary.

Having a Party?

Some sections have reported that they will be holding Birthday Parties for their ARES people. This is a GREAT IDEA! If your group, area or section is doing something like this, please be sure to (a) take pictures or video clips and send them in and (b) invite the media to stop in. Just be careful – 75 candles on one cake can be a bit much.

National Preparedness Month

Presidential Proclamation of NATIONAL PREPAREDNESS MONTH, 2010

A PROCLAMATION

During National Preparedness Month, we stress the importance of strengthening the security and resiliency of our Nation through systematic preparation for the full range of hazards threatening the United States in the 21st century, including natural disasters, cyber attacks, pandemic disease, and acts of terrorism. This year marks the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, one of the most tragic and destructive disasters in American history. In remembrance of this national tragedy, we must reaffirm our commitment to readiness and the necessity of preparedness. By empowering Americans with information about the risks we face, we can all take concrete actions to protect ourselves, our families, our communities, and our country.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) Ready Campaign provides simple and practical steps every American can take to be better prepared. At the community level, Citizen Corps enables volunteers to contribute to homeland security efforts by educating, training, and coordinating local activities that help make us safer, better prepared, and more responsive during emergencies. I encourage all Americans to visit Ready.gov and CitizenCorps.gov for more information and resources on emergency preparedness, including how to prepare a family emergency plan, create an emergency supply kit, and get involved in community preparedness efforts.

My Administration has made emergency and disaster preparedness a top priority, and is dedicated to a comprehensive approach that relies upon the responsiveness and cooperation of government at all levels, the private and nonprofit sectors, and individual citizens. I also encourage Americans to get involved with the thousands of organizations in the National Preparedness Month Coalition, which will share preparedness information and hold preparedness events and activities across the United States. By strengthening citizen preparedness now, we can be ready when disaster strikes.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Barack Obama, President of the United States of America,

by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States,

do hereby proclaim September 2010 as National Preparedness Month.

I encourage all Americans to recognize the importance of preparedness and observe this month by working together to enhance our national security, resilience, and readiness. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-seventh day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand ten, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth.

PSAs Featuring TWC’s Jim Cantore debut in advance of National Preparedness Month

WASHINGTON, D.C., August 31, 2010 / —

In a nationwide effort to encourage all Americans to take steps to prepare for possible emergencies, the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Ready Campaign and The Advertising Council have joined today with The Weather Channel® (TWC) to launch a new series of public service advertisements (PSAs). The PSAs are an extension of the national Ready PSA Campaign and will be distributed in advance of National Preparedness Month (NPM) in September. “These PSAs provide another opportunity to reach Americans about the importance of preparedness,” said Craig Fugate, FEMA Administrator. “While we closely monitor Hurricane Earl and other storms in the Atlantic, FEMA continues to remind the public to take steps now to prepare for severe weather and to help keep their family safe.” http://www.ready.gov/america/about/psa.html

Start NOW on Leonard Award Action

TV, radio, magazines, newspapers, blogs, and webcasts – we were on all of them already in 2010 and it’s only September. Now it is time to prepare to say Thank You to the professional media people who made it happen. The way to do that is to nominate them for the Bill Leonard, W2SKE, Professional Media Award. This national level, annual award honors three professional journalists whose outstanding coverage in audio, video and print formats best reflect the enjoyment, importance and public service value the Amateur Radio Service.

The Award is divided into three categories, each with its own award

a. Audio formats

b. Visual formats

c. Print and Text formats

If you, your group or Amateur Radio activity made the news, this is the way to say thanks and promote good media relations. Full information and application are at www.arrl.org/bill-leonard-award



Going Public

When ARES people are active, they are often in locations that are not viewable by the public. Yes, we get media coverage of our actions, but the best interactions come when John Q Public actually sees it for themselves. John Rader, AA7ZV, sent me a nice media hit recently showing what happens when you “go public.”

Washington State Emergency Radio Test Set for Saturday, July 31, in Lacey

Camp Murray, Wash. – Amateur radio operators from around the Puget Sound region will help the Washington Emergency Management Division (EMD) to field test its emergency communications system July 31 in Lacey. The test, which the public is invited to observe, will take place from 10 a.m. to noon in the parking lot at Cabela’s, 1600 Gateway Blvd. N. E., near the junction of Interstate 5 and Marvin Road in Lacey. Between 15 and 20 amateur radio operators will join with EMD staff to conduct the test of the state’s emergency communications trailer. Using the trailer’s communications equipment, radio operators will attempt to contact county emergency operations centers in all of the state’s 39 counties. “Amateur radio is an important backup system for emergency operations in the event that phone and computer systems break down,” said Bob Purdom, EMD staff coordinator for the test. “Each year we conduct a field test of the amateur radio operations to ensure it can work when it is needed.” He said the test will include radio network control stations in Vancouver, Ephrata and Spokane and volunteers from the state’s Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service.

Here’s the real story…

When Cabela's was first approached about the Camp Murray RACES team operating in their parking lot they were a bit apprehensive until they found out that we were a volunteer organization and not employees of the State of Washington. Out in the parking lot we had a number of visitors stop by asking about what we were doing and there were a number of amateur radio operators that stopped by who expressed an interest in finding out more about emergency communications.

When starting the exercise I stressed to the team that Public Relations was very important and to watch for visitors. Every person that stopped by was greeted by a team member who explained what we were doing and gave them a tour of our operation. We had a nice display of ARRL material to hand out. We had several Cabela's folks come out and also the manager of Cabela's. They liked what they saw and the manager offered an invitation to come back and set up during one of the car shows held at the store. They indicated that during a car show we would get a lot of spectators. This sounds like a great opportunity to promote Amateur Radio.

I was very proud of the team for making sure that all visitors were greeted as soon as they arrived. I think this was a very crucial step in putting Amateur Radio in a good light and was instrumental in our being asked back.

Image of
Download

Cabela's action - in the public eye

The Last Word

Copycat.

Back in grammar school, that was a bad thing to call someone. It could even lead to a fight. Other times, it was used when someone was looking at your answers to a pop quiz. Somehow I never worried about people copying my answers. It didn’t bother me – but then I would subtract one letter at the very last second and change B’s to A and D’s to C, leaving them to scramble and fail. Still, when used in a recess setting, the word had more emotional baggage.

But now, it’s a good word in this context of Contact!

Looking this issue over, there are more than 9 pages containing some really great ideas for you to take, modify, make your own, or simply copy. In fact, the people who help put this together would even appreciate it if you copied! We’ve got a great story to tell this month and throughout the fall. The 75th anniversary is a natural door-opener to many things, from print to television. We have a parallel, supporting action with the National Preparedness Month. I would prefer “not going there,” but the very real hurricane concerns also raise awareness. We can hit this one out of the park. Got a good idea – please share it. Not sure what to do – just ask. Need materials to work with? Just be a copycat.

We’ll be happy if you do.

Allen -w1agp

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